On the freedom of cycling

This is a cross post from The Daily Blog, originally published 20 November 2013. The automobile is often cast as a great liberator. The power to travel long distances at great speed, free of the tyranny of timetables or fixed routes. There is no question that a car can be a very useful tool for […]

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CERA finally listened to Cantabrians on central city transport

After a year of waiting, last week the Accessible City Transport Plan for Christchurch was released. Many Cantabrians had submitted on what kind of transport infrastructure they would like to see for the city, and it’s great to see the difference that those submissions made. Christchurch citizens have overwhelmingly called for a city designed for […]

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Open Streets Christchurch a Success

Christchurch’s recent Open Streets Cyclovia event was a wonderful success.  Central city streets were closed to cars for a day last Sunday, transforming them into a safe haven for cyclists and pedestrians. Residents of all ages took to the central streets on a variety of non-motorised wheeled contraptions to celebrate Christchurch’s potential as New Zealand’s […]

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Better transport planning needed in Christchurch

This week in Christchurch I attended a breakfast lecture by visiting planning consultant Todd Litman from the Victoria Transport Policy Institute, British Colombia.  He was advocating the benefits of “multi-modalism” transport planning – which basically means modern transport planning that spreads the focus over several forms of transport options – cars, public transport, cycleways, and […]

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Day 6 – just 110km or so to go

I’m nearly in Southland, having traversed coastal Otago, and headed west into the strong winds this evening. I left beautiful Karitane this morning, after an incredible breakfast that included gluten free pancakes made by my exceedingly generous hosts. The morning was cool and overcast, perfect conditions for cycling, and still very beautiful. The ocean was […]

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It’s official: Bicycling can save your life

The highly esteemed British Medical Journal has found, after an extensive study, that cycling literally saves lives. The research looked at the differences in health benefits of using a bicycle sharing scheme run in Barcelona compared with travel by a car in an urban environment. The results were clear: public bicycle sharing schemes can improve […]

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Riding the first of the on-road Cycle Trails

This weekend, I got to ride big parts of the 180km route from Taumarunui to New Plymouth. The ride was a celebration of the opening of the first on-road component of Nga Haerenga, the New Zealand Cycle Trail. The weekend had a bit of everything: gorgeous scenery, local hospitality, wide-eyed children, even local political drama. […]

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MPs combine across party lines for cycling safety

As the Green Party’s spokesperson on Cycling I have had the opportunity to carry forward my background in advocacy for cycling into new areas. For example, our work as a co-sponsor with John Key (he brings the dollars, we bring the cycling expertise) has seen Nga Haerenga (the NZ Cycle Trail Network) develop from a […]

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Rally brings hope for safer cycling

Yesterday, along with my colleagues Keith Locke and David Clendon (and Jacinda Ardern from Labour), I had the pleasure of attending the Bikes for Life rally in Auckland which you may have seen on the news last night. The rally was called in response to the recent spate of deaths we have seen on our roads. The husband […]

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Last chance to get Dominion Road bus/cycle way

Just a reminder that the last day for submissions on the redesign of Dominion Road is this Sunday, 29th of August. I’ve commented on this issue before so will be brief.  Auckland City Council is planning to redesign Dominion Road, one of the busier roads in central Auckland. Their plans for redesign currently involve letting […]

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She was asking for it

Reaction from Auckland motorists to the Greg Paterson bicycle incident has been largely unsympathetic in today’s Herald, especially the editorial. The implicit argument from drivers that cyclists break rules so are not worthy of protection beggars belief. It also an argument that gets repeated ad nauseum around the world it seems: The myth of the scofflaw […]

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Cycleway shifts up a gear

A journalist remarked to me on Monday that they found it strange to see John Key and I sitting together (one green tie, one blue) to answer media questions about the New Zealand Cycleway Project. My position is that when the Memorandum of Understanding with National was signed he (correctly) indicated that there were some […]

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Cycling to the polling booth

The Cycle Advocacy Network has released the results of its poll on which candidates are cycle friendly.  And again the results are fairly compelling: The results relied, at least in part, on parties and candidates willingness to engage and respond, so I am sure some parties on that list fared worse than they felt they […]

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Labour plans to invest in transport look familiar

As part of its response to the impending economic crisis Labour yesterday announced changes to it planned expenditure on roading.   Like Act they recognise a good idea when someone else has it and appear to have drawn heavily from the Greens: An enhancement of the existing Financial Assistance Rate for funding local roading would be […]

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Bike helmets

Transport safety Minister Harry Duynhoven’s comment about bike helmets, “I wonder if we never had helmets what our cycle population might be … I’m not advocating getting rid of helmets, I’m just saying I wonder what the social effect of helmets has been,” is interesting but basically irrelevant to the important debate about promoting cycling […]

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Walking to work

It was fairly impressive this morning to see swathes of people people enjoying the Wellington spring sunshine as they walked  to work along the waterfront.  Sadly this massive increase in pedestrians was all due to entirely the wrong reasons.  No matter what you may think of Go Wellington’s industrial dispute with its bus drivers, a […]

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