Step 1 to changing the Government: The MOU

Green Party and Labour announcement

Yesterday we told New Zealanders thirsty for a better country that change is on the way. Yesterday Labour and the Greens announced an historic agreement to work cooperatively to change the Government at the 2017 election. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed between us commits us to working more closely together in Parliament and includes […]

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Blog – Budget 2016: What about ordinary working people?

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Ordinary working New Zealanders don’t fare very well from this Budget. Setting aside the spin from the Government, it contains a lot to be concerned about and a fudging of the numbers. For example, the forecast is that the average wage is set to increase to $63,000 per annum by 2020, but when you consider […]

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Steffan Browning: Pesticide reduction and Organic Growth Strategy in Budget 2016

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The Budget is an opportunity for the Government to launch a pesticide reduction strategy that multiplies the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) and the Ministry for Primary Industries capacity to reassess pesticides and other toxins. A government organic strategy and supportive advisory programme, could mean a major switch to highest value organic production for our primary production exports from all parts of New Zealand.

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Gareth Hughes: Budget 2016 – Smarter, Better, Cleaner, Stronger

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This Thursday Bill English will deliver his eighth Budget. Will it continue the trend of previous National budgets, making tertiary education less affordable, putting only token funds into innovation, and subsidising polluters? Budgets aren’t what they used to be. Once upon a time in our history they were events, where everyone tuned-in to hear how […]

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Denise Roche: What I’m looking for in Budget 2016 Pt I

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I’m a strong supporter of the #DoubleTheQuota campaign and its goals to not just double New Zealand’s intake of refugees, but also double the funding we allocate to help them settle into life in New Zealand. The Government has signalled that it’s been thinking about the refugee quota, and the Budget would be an ideal time to announce that it’s prepared to invest a bit more so New Zealand can take a step towards doing its fair share to help the global refugee crisis.

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Robbing Aucklanders to pay Rio Tinto

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New Zealand’s national electricity grid stretches the length of the country and contains some 11,803 kilometres of high-voltage lines and 178 substations. It wouldn’t make sense for competing power companies to duplicate and build their own expensive electricity transmission system so we have a single provider, a monopoly called Transpower, which is meant to be […]

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Mega media merger is bad news

Some people call newspapers “tomorrow’s fish and chips paper” but this week’s news around a mega media merger is not an issue we should discard. Australian media giants Fairfax and APN News & Media announced they were in discussions to merge their New Zealand businesses (NZME. and Fairfax NZ) which could lead to what’s being […]

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RMA changes restrict public’s right to have a say

Restricting public participation under the RMA as the  Resource Legislation Bill proposes will limit the ability of individuals and organisations to speak out for nature  and protect areas such as the Denniston Plateau from coal mining and limit the ability of councils to consider the information submissions provide

The National Government’s Resource Legislation Bill has been described as making the most fundamental changes to the RMA since it was passed in 1991. It’s a complicated and technical bill which makes 40 changes to six different Acts, including the RMA. Sir Geoffrey Palmer, the original architect of the RMA has identified, “at least three […]

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Peering through the Huntly coal smokescreen

Energy Minister Simon Bridges revealed in Parliament this week he has no idea what majority state-owned power companies are up to, when he wrongly claimed that Genesis Energy would not burn coal at Huntly unless there was a shortage of renewable electricity. Was it ignorance or a smokescreen? Responding to Genesis Energy’s decision to backtrack […]

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