TISA – Another secret trade deal you may never have heard of

  This post first appeared on The Daily Blog You’ve probably heard of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) by now and the widespread concerns around it but what about the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA) also being currently negotiated by our Government? TISA is another so-called trade deal, negotiated in secret, aiming at a liberalisation […]

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Global Mode bullying won’t stop people accessing content

It’s disappointing that strong-arm tactics from powerful media companies have meant Global Mode will not get its day in court. Today a settlement was reached terminating the Global Mode service, developed in New Zealand by ByPass Network Services and used by some New Zealand ISPs and consumers to circumvent geoblocking and give Kiwis open access to global media content.

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Dairy conversions causing more pollution than ever, report shows

The Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (PCE) released two reports on freshwater quality and management last Friday. The water quality report shows that dairy conversions are hurting water quality and says that despite great efforts with fencing and planting, large increases in cow numbers are resulting in excess nitrogen and thus pollution in water ways. […]

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My Electric Journey Around Northland

Over the weekend, Labour’s Stuart Nash called for the Crown’s ministerial limo fleet to be replaced with electric vehicles (EVs). I’m delighted by this, because the Greens have been saying this for some time and it’s great that the idea is catching on more broadly. Electric vehicles are now a real, serious option that threatens […]

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Will the Super Fund now follow its own advice and divest from coal?

Whenever we’ve asked the New Zealand Superannuation Fund what they’re doing about climate change, they’ve said they’re waiting for the Mercer report they’d backed to come out. Well it’s now out and it’s unequivocal about the impact of climate change – investing in fossil fuels is objectively bad for your returns. Mercer has made one […]

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Harbour infilling being fast tracked in Lyttelton

In Auckland there was a justifiable public uproar about the Auckland Port Company’s plans to extend Bledisloe Wharf and occupy valuable parts of the Waitemata. Auckland Council intervened to scale back the proposal. Meanwhile, in democracy deprived Canterbury, the Lyttelton Port Company (LPC) wants to fill in 27 hectares of Whakaraupō/Lyttelton Harbour – that’s the […]

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Dealing With The Gap: Part five of five on our ‘justice gap’ crisis

In 2013, Julie Macfarlane, a Canadian law professor, conducted a study into self-represented litigants. Interviewing some 280 self-represented litigants, she was struck by “how traumatised people are by the experiences they’re having, how many lives are getting wrecked, how much anger and frustration is out there.” There’s no doubt that the symptoms of the ‘justice […]

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My first week

What a whirlwind week it has been. Today is my seventh as Green Party Co-leader. It’s a good opportunity to pause and reflect. I’ve lost count of the interviews with media I’ve done this week: everything from morning TV shows to student radio to the National Business Review. It’s been really great to have these […]

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Walking the Labyrinth: Part three of five on the ‘justice gap’ crisis

So why are so many people opting for self-representation? What does this mean for them, and for our justice system? Being a Self-Represented Litigant Self-representation seems appealing on the face of it. Theoretically, it gives the litigant total control over the part they play in proceedings, and it keeps their costs down. Most fundamentally, it […]

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Paying for Justice: Part two of five on the ‘justice gap’ crisis

Yesterday, I wrote about the ‘justice gap’ – the inevitable consequence of a ‘user pays’ justice system that abandons those people most vulnerable to exploitation. The most obvious symptom of this is the rising number of self-represented litigants: take the figures in yesterday’s post, evidence of a grim problem in need of urgent attention. The […]

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Saying it Loud on Climate in Christchurch

The Government’s Christchurch consultation meeting on New Zealand’s emission targets was inspiring – not for what was in the Ministry for the Environment’s (MFE’s) defeatist video about the obstacles to changing to a low carbon future, but for what the people said. Hundreds came and people were still wanting to speak two hours later when […]

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