NZ Green Party
Introducing our Green Youth MPs

Danielle Lusk – Metiria Turei

Metiria Turei's Youth MP - Danielle Lusk

Metiria Turei’s Youth MP – Danielle Lusk

Age: 16

School: Buller High School, Westport

Tell us a bit about yourself: Hello there, I’m a keen adventuress, I love the outdoors, it’s pretty mean. It is my intention to become a white water kayaking guide, because who wouldn’t want to work, live and breathe the outdoors!  My main interests include: Kayaking, hanging with mates and just ‘chillin’. My parents have taught me to be myself, question everything and stand up for what I believe in. As for my story, well to be honest I’m just your average high school student trying to get through NCEA without a glitch.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: Well, I chose to be a Green Youth MP because everyone else was going for the Labour Youth MP’s so I decided to be a lil’ different and choose the Green Party, not actually thinking I would get through. What I would like to achieve: Keeping New Zealand NZ owned and operated. Education is a main issue for me as in my opinion it is to be free, this should be the case particularly in a low income area, but it’s not. Someone once told me that we should be focusing on the country’s priorities by using what we have learnt in the past to protect and plan our future in an innovative and sustainable manner.

It seems to me that what the Government is doing at the moment is failing, in more than one aspect! I believe in changing the Governments priorities, so instead of throwing away money to the rich, I would put the money into education, helping eliminate child poverty and give it to the people that ACTUALLY need it!  I will bring back what I have learnt to my community and my school and hopefully put my knowledge to good use!

“If you’re not going to speak up, how is the world supposed to know you exist?”

Isabella Lenihan-Ikin – Russel Norman

Russel Norman's Youth MP - Isabella Lenihan-Ikin

Dr Russel Norman’s Youth MP – Isabella Lenihan-Ikin

Age: 16

School: Western Springs College, Auckland

Tell us a bit about yourself: I am passionate about forming solutions on climate change and ensuring intergenerational justice in Aotearoa. I have grown up in a family where my parents saw the importance of teaching their children (my older brother and I) the value of living a very low carbon lifestyle; one that gave back to Papatuanuku and to society, not just took from them. I have been involved in environmental movements from a young age and I can remember vividly my first protest for GE Free Aotearoa in 2006. Since then, I have become involved in local school based groups and movements to minimise waste in my school, Western Springs College, regional Auckland Council groups and also national networks of young people fighting for climate justice with groups such as Generation Zero.

I joined the Green Party, at my own initiation when I was 12, as I wanted to learn more about New Zealand politics and environmental, social and climatic issues that the Greens were very knowledgeable about. I am really interested in engaging young people in politics, and I feel that many young people are politically illiterate. My friends think that most of my time is spent discussing and forming solutions with other like-minded, engaged young people on climate change when not doing school work, but I also really enjoy playing the saxophone, writing poetry, reading, playing soccer, as well as volunteering at the local trade aid shop.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: I really wanted to become a Youth MP as I am passionate about climatic and environmental issues as well as engaging young people in society and politics. Youth in New Zealand and all over the world can play a really key role in shaping the society we want to live in, in the future. We want to see the government respond positively to climate change, by addressing the issue now to reduce the impact this global catastrophe will have on Aotearoa. Because we pride ourselves on being a democracy, I think it is really important that young people (who are unable to vote) understand how we can influence politics as well. I want to politicise students from my school and community, and educate them of political issues such as climate change and consequential effect these issues have on our generation.Conversely, I want to demonstrate, through my time as a Youth MP, what change and impact they can make on that issue.

I am going to run political literacy – civics education – workshops at my school before I attend Youth Parliament. In these workshops, I want young people to understand how important politics is for them and in doing so transform their prejudice of politics being an ‘omnipotent entity that cannot be accessed by the general voting populous, let alone under 18 non-voting citizens’ into something more inviting and exciting; a place where youth feel that regardless of being under 18 their voice is still significant. Not only excited about the lead up to youth parliament and talking with young people about politics, I am also really keen to meet the 120 other youth MP’s and listen to their aspirations for Aotearoa.

Georgina Lomax-Sawyers – Kevin Hague

Kevin Hague's Youth MP - Georgina Lomax-Sawyers

Kevin Hague’s Youth MP – Georgina Lomax-Sawyers

Age: 15

School: Buller High School, Westport

Tell us a bit about yourself: I’ve grown up in a big family, I am one of six kids. Being part of a large family there is one thing you learn, to be loud. Very loud. So I have always been quite outspoken about my opinions, which is probably why I enjoy debating so much. I absolutely love talking and my friends and family often get rather annoyed with me because of it. Also being part of a big family can lead to you being quite dramatic, well I seem to be at least as I love drama. I have also done ballet since I was about five. I have grown up on the West Coast of the South Island in a little mining town called Westport, apart from five years when I lived in Wellington. I attend the local high school, which can be quite an exciting place so I always come home with very interesting stories!

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: I wanted to be a Green Youth MP because I feel a responsibility towards my community, that our thoughts and opinions be heard. I believe that the Green Party is looking toward the future and trying to create a country in which all are treated equally, a country in which we respect each other and the environment.

I want to achieve as much good green change as I can in my community and let the voice of our youth be heard at a national level. When I look around I see a number of green issues in my community, like mining and coastal erosion, and of course climate change, but also social issues like poverty. The Green Party is the way for our community and young people to be behind this. By being a Green Youth MP I hope to be able to contribute to this change.

Rachel Mclean-Dewes – Catherine Delahunty

Catherine Delahunty's Youth MP - Rachel Mclean-Dewes

Catherine Delahunty’s Youth MP – Rachel Mclean-Dewes

Age: 17

School: Gisborne Girls High School, Gisborne

Tell us a bit about yourself: Kia Ora. My name is Rachel, I’m 17 years old and I live on the East Coast of New Zealand in Gisborne. I am a Year 13 student and prefect at Gisborne Girls High School. I have two sisters, one older and one younger than myself. My family has always been very important to me. I have an amazing group of people in my life which is why my friends are very important to me as well. I have an endless love for music. I sing in our choir at school and I’m a part of a local band where I sing also. I’ve played the saxophone for six years and have recently started playing guitar. I am really passionate about youth and particularly the youth in my community.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: I wanted to be a Green Youth MP because it sounded like a great opportunity to get involved in something that would push me to voice my opinion more freely. I’ve always had a great passion for social justice and support the majority of the Green Party’s policies.

Another reason I wanted to be a Green Youth MP was because of my fascination with politics. I intend to study a Bachelor Of Arts next year but I am still undecided on what to major in but I feel that politics is and will always be an option for me. I am hoping that this experience will further develop my leadership skills and give me a new outlook on issues that concern us as young people of New Zealand. I am also hoping that Youth Parliament will give me new ideas and ways of thinking that I can take back to my home town and overall benefit my local community. This in itself I believe to be an achievement.

 

Abbas Nazari – Kennedy Graham

Kennedy Graham and his Youth MP Abbas Nazari

Kennedy Graham and his Youth MP Abbas Nazari

Age: 17

Organisation: University of Canterbury, Christchurch

Tell us a bit about yourself: I am an Afghan-born Kiwi living in New Zealand. I was born in Afghanistan and fled the regime of the Taliban with my family in 2001. I have been living in New Zealand ever since and have assimilated into the New Zealand identity and culture. I love being different. My background and my age relative to most Uni students means I can pursue a different course than most teens. My days consist of studying at Uni, working as a real estate agent in the weekends and afternoons and going for runs or hitting the gym in the evenings. Currently, I am studying towards a double degree in Law and Political Science at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch. Last year, following a Classical Studies tour of Greece and Italy with my Burnside High School class, I went back to Afghanistan and documented my journey back to my homeland for the first time in over a decade. This culminated in me doing a TED talk and sharing the story of my people.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: Coming from Afghanistan, it is only natural to have a keen interest in global affairs and political relations. I saw Kennedy Graham as a mentor that i could learn from, due to his vast experience in international relations. I chose to become a Youth MP because I see it as an opportunity to develop my leadership and and networking skills. It is a forum for the youth of this nation to be truly engaged in the current affairs of this nation and get up and close to seeing how the gears of our democracy function. At this age, I doubt any one of the Youth MP’s have clear and defined political alignments and agendas, so I can speak with assurance that I became a Youth MP for the experience of it all and not due to political affiliation. This platform will allow me to develop a clearer understanding of our political structure and therefore make more informed decisions in the future. I also look forward to meeting like-minded students that are just as interested in politics.

Bridget White – Eugenie Sage

Eugenie Sage and her Youth MP Bridget White

Eugenie Sage and her Youth MP Bridget White

Age: 15

School: Unlimited Paenga Tawhiti, Christchurch

Tell us a bit about yourself: Hello! My name is Bridget and I’m about to tell you a little bit about myself! I’ve lived in Christchurch for all my life, and absolutely love it! Six months ago I decided to go vegan, and it’s been one of the hardest but also one of the best things I’ve ever done. I’ve worked for two and a half years in a conservation group called Conservation Action Network. We don’t spend our time picking up litter around the school (although it is an extremely important issue). We’re interested in national and global issues around conservation, sustainability and the environment. I’m particularly interested in the oceans and how we treat them. I’ve been on a mission to raise awareness that shark finning still occurs in New Zealand waters, and how the public needs to stand up to stop it! For the last few months I’ve also been heavily interested in the Hector’s dolphins and how their population is still declining despite the marine mammal sanctuary. Last year, I spoke in the youth panel at the Forest and Bird conference, which was a brilliant opportunity! I strongly support Sea Shepherd, and am an on-shore volunteer for their brilliant organisation! I’ve also just started volunteering for SAFE, which is an amazing experience because I not only get to dress up in animal costumes, but also protect and save the animals that mean so much to me! I love tramping, especially around Arthur’s Pass, with all the cheeky kea! I’m also interested in photography, and love taking pictures of just about anything!

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: There are heaps of reasons that I want to be a Green Youth MP. I’ve always been interested in the politics around the environment, and how they affect the changes that happen. I’ve always wanted to be able to make a difference, and I believe that getting my voice through Youth Parliament would be a great start! I have many opinions around how our government treats our environment, in particular our oceans, and want to have a voice. I also want my voice to be heard around the new legislation – the amendments to the Crown Minerals (Permitting and Crown Land) Bill under international law, or, as many people know, the Anadarko Amendment. It’s taking away our rights as a country to stand up for what we believe in.

One of the reasons I wanted to be a Youth MP was simply because of intergenerational theft – having things like the Maui’s dolphins and the right to protest at sea taken away from the younger generations, who don’t have a voice yet. I want to get a better idea of how parliament runs, so I know how to make a difference in the coming years. I also want to let the country and the world know how our current Government treats our environment.

Raven Maeder – Gareth Hughes

Gareth Hughes' Youth MP - Raven Maeder

Gareth Hughes’ Youth MP – Raven Maeder

Age: 15

School: Nelson College for Girls, Nelson

Tell us a bit about yourself: Born in Switzerland and raised in Aotearoa, I have been lucky to grow up in beautiful Nelson, NZ’s potential solar capital. Because I am surrounded by precious wild places  such as the Able Tasman National Park, my favourite thing to do is be outdoors. I love hiking, camping, sailing…and the fact that I have grown up in the outdoors has made me passionate about protecting it. I am the co-founder and an active member of ‘Nelson youth climate action group’, volunteer for many groups such as Gen Zero, Greenpeace, 350.org, and also the Green Party. I am hugely interested in politics and take action as much as I can about things I believe in, such as preventing deep sea oil drilling in Aotearoa, investing in renewables, protecting our native animals, stopping asset sales, and taking action on climate change.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: Becoming a Green Youth MP was the prime chance for me to directly have my voice heard as well as having the opportunity to give other youth the chance to have their voices heard too. I want to be able to experience and learn how change is brought about in a democratic way, through political avenues in contrast to activism and learn more about how our government works. My vision for New Zealand is totally along the same lines as the Green Party policies so having a chance to represent them and make their policies more accessible to young people is an exciting challenge for me.

By being a Green Youth MP I hope to inspire other youth to speak up about their vision for NZ and voice their concerns so that I can help them to have them heard. I would also love to encourage young people to become more politically aware and active as we will be the leaders of the future and the decisions being made by our leaders now, directly affect us and the coming generations. I very much look forward to becoming more active within my community and talking to as many people as possible about their vision for NZ and sharing mine. I also hope to directly voice my opinions and visions to our leaders at parliament.

Caitlin Smart – David Clendon

David Clendon's Youth MP - Caitlin Smart

David Clendon’s Youth MP – Caitlin Smart

Age: 16

School: St Dominic’s College, Auckland

Tell us a bit about yourself: Hiya! I’m Caitlin, and I’m a proud Westie in my last year of high school. I’m a science nerd at heart, and I plan on studying either science or engineering next year. However, I am also very keen on public speaking and human rights issues. I have been involved with UNYouth since 2011, and am also the founder and leader of our school’s Amnesty International crew. When I’m not lobbying or experimenting, you can find me playing soccer, performing spoken word or just generally chilling with my friends and family.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: I’ve always admired the Green Party; I believe that the Greens have a fresh approach to politics and are committed to hearing out the voices and opinions of the youth of New Zealand. As a Youth MP, I want to be able to meet like-minded young leaders and make friends with other Youth MPs from all over the country. Hopefully, I will be able to take my experiences from Parliament and use them to get others in West Auckland interested and involved in politics, governance and making a difference when it comes to the ‘big issues’.

Corey Fuimaono – Jan Logie

Jan Logie's Youth MP - Corey Fuimaono

Jan Logie’s Youth MP – Corey Fuimaono

Age: 17

School: Aotea College, Porirua

Tell us a bit about yourself: Simply put, I’m a Leader with an awkward sense of humour. On one hand, I’m the Deputy Head Boy at Aotea College, but I’m quite the tech-savvy teenager as well; having a comprehensive understanding of Technology and Media – and how they both affect and have a form of contribution to society. I am also quite interested in people in general; how I can help through the use of my talents & how I can relate to others whom are different in ways not just limited to thought. I hope to work on all of these interests of mine when I study related subjects – gaining Bachelors – at SIT next year.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: I come from a family of hardworking people who work towards contributing their knowledge and skills to the community. So in terms of political ideology, our family has always believed in liberal views – so my decision to be a Green Youth MP came naturally. Besides, politics was always a side-thing I had spare time for, arguing viewpoints ever since I was young. When I was filling my application out, I pointed out that as part of the Green Party’s manifesto, I personally believed in their views and goals – especially when it came to Marriage Equality and caring for our environment. That every couple should be seen as equal under the law and that every New Zealander has the responsibility to look after and be able to freely access the rough and rugged landscape, as caretakers of the land, that earns our most important reputation worldwide – “Clean & Green” and not just Middle Earth.

As a Youth MP, I will be able to highlight such issues and create discussion, debate around them – the issues that are currently affecting this country and its people to date. For that, I’d like to be with the Green Party to press these issues forward to create change, for the better.

Patrick Gerard – Steffan Browning

Steffan Browning's Youth MP - Patrick Gerard

Steffan Browning’s Youth MP – Patrick Gerard

Age: 16

School: Nelson College for Boys, Nelson

Tell us a bit about yourself: I grew up in a small and isolated area of the Pelorus Sound in the Marlborough Sounds on my parent’s lifestyle farm where my family and I have learned to respect the surrounding natural environments. From a young age, I have always been interested in native plants and their role in the broader biodiversity of New Zealand, particularly the Marlborough Sounds. I have also had to learn a large amount about the sea and its natural inhabitants as well as the relationships people have developed with local waterways as time has gone by. I have a firm belief that humans are always at the bottom; we can only take advantage of and exploit the environment for so long before we are thrown into our places again.

This stance I have taken against some of the recent aquaculture developments within the Marlborough Sounds, including the New Zealand King Salmon proposal where eight of the nine proposed farms were to be cited entirely within Coastal Marine Zone One areas where aquaculture development is prohibited. I was lucky enough to speak to the board of inquiry about my opinions in the hearing and although I was not happy with the outcome, it was a great opportunity to gain experience in an area I am very interested in. When I am home, I love to do something tactile for a change like gardening, bush walks, carpentry and being out and about on the sea. I enjoy boarding at Nelson College and in the future I plan to study marine biology, ecology or biochemistry at university.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: I decided I would like to apply to become a Green Youth MP because of the incredible opportunity it gives me to share my thoughts and hopefully gather other valuable points from like-minded teenagers who are likely to hold important leadership positions at certain points in the future. I would like to be able to show my disappointment with particular amendments in the RMA and help to suggest what I believe to be improvements, which would disallow corporate businesses to take advantage of delicate and pristine environments I believe should be managed in such a way that ensures their existence for future generations. Sustainability is a key focus for me and although 100% self-sustainability as a nation seems virtually impossible to many of us at the moment, it should be seen as an ultimate, long term goal that can be achieved with a bit of elbow grease and dedication.

Kaya Miriau – Denise Roche

Denise Roche's Youth MP - Kaya Miriau

Denise Roche’s Youth MP – Kaya Miriau

Age: 17

School: Papakura High School, Auckland

Tell us a bit about yourself: Since I was 8 years old, a career in politics has always been an option. Mrs Halpin (Robin Halpin), my teacher at Miller Avenue School in Paeroa, planted the seed for my dreams of becoming Prime Minister of New Zealand. This was when Helen Clark became Prime Minister for her second term so I wrote a letter to congratulate her on the success. The fact that Helen Clark, the Prime Minister of New Zealand, had replied to my letter was unbelievably inspiring. I have attended one primary school and three different secondary schools. I spent 2 years at Paeroa College, 1 year at Massey High School and am now in my 2nd and final year at Papakura High School as a prefect. Music has become an important factor in my life – always there to get me through good times and bad. I have a passion for chemistry, which has encouraged me to go to university to pursue a career in science. Although my career choices have broadened over time and more options have become available, I believe that a politician is still in the line up for my future careers.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: 2013 is the first year I have heard about Youth Parliament so seeing as it is my last year at secondary school and I’ve always wanted to be involved with Parliament, I applied to become a Youth MP. I feel that this is the opportunity I need so I can get a perspective on what life as a politician can be like and help voice the public’s opinions. Talking and being a voice for others is something I’ve always done. I realize this can become highly annoying but I think I do it because everyone deserves to be heard and some people just can’t seem to get their views across. I’m hoping that being a Youth MP will help me progress with my people and political skills and maybe it will open my mind to new opinions. I wish to gain as much as I can out of this experience and hope that people do hear what we have to say. 

Anchal Singh – Holly Walker

Holly Walker and her Youth MP Anchal Singh

Holly Walker and her Youth MP Anchal Singh

Age: 16

School: Wainuiomata High School, Wellington

Tell us a bit about yourself: I was born in Fiji and moved to Wellington with my family at the age of 1. I live with my parents, my older sister, a university student, and my younger sister, a high school student like myself. My family have gone through a lot of hardship since we came to Wellington, but we are aware that we are still better off than so many people in our own society, which I only became aware of in the past few years as I got to know how the real world works. This has made me an intelligent, calm but confident, happy, caring and thankful person. It also makes me a dreamer, because I dream that someday, everything for everyone will be okay, and I hope that I can be even a little part of that change. I enjoy cooking, painting, travelling, reading and spending time on the computer like most teenagers do these days. I LOVE spending my spare time with my family and friends, if it wasn’t for them I wouldn’t have even thought about taking up this opportunity, I am very thankful for the unconditional support and love they provide me with. They make me try my best and work hard, they are the reason for all of my successes and for the ones to come.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: I first heard about being a Youth MP from my friend. He told me we should take the opportunity because it would be good for our leadership skills (and it would look good on our CV and for University). At first I didn’t really want to, I mean I didn’t want to go anywhere near politics, but he still dragged me along and signed me up. Then that night I thought about how I could be a voice for the students around me, because there are people that have so many good ideas but don’t think that even our own local leaders will listen because of our ‘position’ in society. I want to make people aware that the government isn’t just different parties arguing, it’s about the people trying to make our society a better place for everyone including the youth. Even if we don’t get to vote, I want them to be aware that they can be heard. I chose to represent the Green Party because they treat their policies with equality, one isn’t more important than the other. I also want people to be aware that the Green Party isn’t just about the environment, though I do feel that not enough attention is paid towards the environment, but that the Green Party thinks about the country as a whole and show what exactly they have to offer NZ society.

George Moon – Julie Anne Genter

Julie Anne Genter's Youth MP - George Moon

Julie Anne Genter’s Youth MP – George Moon

Age: 18

Organisation: University of Canterbury, Christchurch

Tell us a bit about yourself: Kia Ora. As a Youth MP I’m here to represent your views, but if you want to learn more about me, here’s a brief summary! I go to University of Canterbury, where I’m studying a BSc in computer science with a side of political science. Outside of uni, I enjoy many activities, but my favourites are tramping, skiing, the great outdoors, technology, playing instruments (ukuleles and pianos!) and conservation. I was born in Wellington, but moved to Christchurch a few months later where I have lived ever since. In the community I have helped out with Forest and Bird plantings, done voluntary rubbish clean ups, protested at the ‘Restore Our Democracy’ rally, participated in youth forums and other activities both at uni/school and in the wider community.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: Why Green? Well, the simple reason is that the party is the only one that has policies with intelligent solutions to issues that matter. I believe the Greens stand for a fair and equal society, with an economy that works with the environment, as opposed to abusing it for short term economic gain.

I decided to apply to be a Youth MP because I thought I would do a good job of representing the opinions of the people here, which is even more important after the denial of democracy in post EQ Christchurch. From this experience I aim to learn more about the parliamentary process and how this country runs, so I can make a positive difference to NZ both now and in the future. By the end of my tenure as a Youth MP I would hope that I could say that I fairly represented the hopes, thoughts and opinions of the people in my community and that my efforts, along with the 120 other Youth MPs, would be constructive and beneficial to the future of our country.

Dean Buckley – Mojo Mathers

Mojo Mathers' Youth MP - Dean Buckley

Mojo Mathers’ Youth MP – Dean Buckley

Age: 17

School: Kelston Boy’s High School, Auckland

Tell us a bit about yourself: My name is Dean Buckley and I am a student. I was born profoundly (completely) deaf, I was raised by my parents and I am the only deaf person in my family. I live in Auckland with my parents, I am so thankful for having supportive parents that parent a child with special needs. I also have 4 siblings; 3 brothers and one sister. My family and I use sign language in simultaneous communication, instead of using New Zealand Sign Language, because it is my preference.

From the day I was born I have always had to fight hard, as I spent a lot of time in and out of hospital. My early milestones didn’t come naturally. I had to learn how to hold my head up at the age of 6 months old, sit at a year old, walk at 17 months old. I have had a lot of surgeries; the next surgery is on the 30th of April, just a day before my tenure as a Youth MP begins. So, it makes me realise how lucky I am to live in New Zealand. Anyway, I am a senior student (year 13) and currently studying at Kelston Boys’ High School. I am a current Deaf Provision student leader, Pastoral Prefect (KBHS), Senior Student Council Representative and Student Representative to the Combined Board of Trust for Kelston Deaf Education Centre (KDEC). I am doing level 2 and 3 NCEA this year; English, maths, physics, geography, graphics and arts. I also won 1st prize at the KDEC speech competitions last year.

Before I started my first physics class in high school, I was told that I will never be able to pass physics and I kept fighting, saying that I WILL NOT fail physics, so I successfully proved that they were wrong. I never say “I CAN’T” or “It is impossible to..…”, because these words are not in my dictionary. My everyday interests are reading, studying, watching news (including some politics, of course), spending time on the computer and chatting with friends. Outdoor sports: swimming, hiking, camping and golfing. But I don’t play sports very often. I am looking forward to accomplishing my dreams, goals and achievements, I want to be an architect (urban designer and planner) and landscape architect, I just want to do something I enjoy, not for money. Architecture is my passion and my inspiration is Noel Lane, architect. I would love to help people with special needs in the future, no matter who, because I want to show the world what kind of person I am and I don’t judge people as well. I also fully support the various types of sexual orientations, because I am gay and I am so grateful that marriage amendment bill has passed on the 17th of April 2013.

Why do you want to be a Youth MP and what do you want to get out of the experience?: I want to be a Green Youth MP this year because I want to show the world what deaf people are capable of, but it is not all about deaf people, it is about attitude. I want to have a chance to participate in the Youth Parliament this year because I would love to learn something new and gain experience in politics and study how politics works in the parliament. I also want to promote deaf awareness for our community, improve the accessibility for the people with disabilities, better education and rights for deaf and including other disabled students…etc. Thank you for your time in reading about me, I am looking forward to entering the Youth Parliament in July and meeting the Youth MPs. See you all there!

119 thoughts on “Introducing our Green Youth MPs

  1. So great to see the futures in such great hands. Pity my generation is going to leave them with such big challenges though.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 7 (+4)

  2. what an exciting bunch of young people who give us more hope for the future!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 6 (+1)

  3. What great young people – gives me hope for the future.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 6 (+1)

  4. Such a shame to see young people getting into politics.

    Run. Enjoy the sun. Travel. Experience life. Come back to it, if you must, when you’ve grown up and have something to offer.

    Preferably 40+….

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 12 (-3)

  5. Such a shame to see young people getting into business.

    Run. Enjoy the sun. Travel. Experience life. Come back to it, if you must, when you’ve grown up and have something to offer.

    Preferably 40+….

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 11 (0)

  6. The difference in business is you’re not trying to interfere in so many other people’s lives.

    It’s a bad enough “quality” in people who have considerable life experience, let alone children. I’m guessing none of these kids see a significantly reduced role for the state.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 12 (-2)

  7. @Arana. You have no idea on what these youth are interested in. I see that many of these people are different than average teenagers that are normally represented through the media. These teenagers are probably interested in how our democracy works, from the inside. Don’t ruin their chance.

    We are Anonymous, we are legion.
    We do not forget, we do not forgive.
    Expect Us.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 7 (+3)

  8. Politics 101 (According to Arana)
    Politics is the business of Old, White Businessmen (like John Key, though he has no real business experience, just Money Trading).
    All vibrant young people – go to the back of the queue.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 8 (-1)

  9. I’m reminded of a quote:

    “The day the power of love overrules the love of power, the world will know peace”

    And another:

    “Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely”

    So, I think it is right to be suspicious of power, to always speak truth to power, and be very suspicious of people who seek power over you, whoever they may be.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 3 (+2)

  10. Don’t ruin their chance.

    How am I “ruining their chance”?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 2 (+1)

  11. By ‘ruin their chance’, I think anon meant ‘rain on their party’.
    If you can’t see that you did that, Arana, and do that constantly, Arana, then there’s no hope at all for you.

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  12. Being in politics means coming up against people who don’t agree with you. That’s grown-up reality.

    However, I’m a good natured, playful type. If I’m somehow perceived as difficult, then someone aspiring to a life in politics should perhaps rethink their “career” choice.

    There be dragons :)

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  13. Such an amazing bunch of young people, really looking forward to seeing what they can do! Congratulations to all!!! x

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  14. Congratulating them all and hoping they tune into the constructive, cooperative, serving, interconnected side of international green philosophy and retain the vibrancy and creativity of the NZ youth. Yes they will need to debate cynical people, and yes they will be received cynically at times, and yes they will have reason for cynicism. Green philosophy is deep enough, meaningful enough, and transformational enough, to not be rocked and swayed by others’ reactions overly. While the experienced older generations hold the fort they can develop a strong foundation together.

    Yes, love of power is dangerous, but not all those wielding power do so because they crave power over others, some focus on making a difference. I congratulate these students in focusing where the need and opportunity is rather than where the current power lies. The philosophies of some other political parties that pander to corporations as the heroes and solutions to all problems mean less connected youths would rather be drawn there if they look for power or prestige.

    Congratulations! We expect great things in due time :-)

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  15. Fantastic, Danielle! What a surprise, good on you, kiddo.

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  16. I wonder what Arana thinks about the place of idealism, especially in young people – in their willingness to do more than party and chase high-paying jobs and buy the latest gadget. I’m thinking about some of the great figures of history, who were willing to spend their lives working in political systems to make things better for humankind (eg. William Wilberforce, Martin Luther King and others). I find it pretty sad that the idealism of these young people is somehow treated suspiciously, seeing them as simply wanting to exercise power over others. I’m afraid it is characteristic of much of what Arana has to say – little that is affirming and positive. Arana speaks of “love”. I hear love in much of what these young people have to say.

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  17. I treat politicians, and aspiring politicians, the same way, whether they are 18 or 80. Deconstruct the euphemisms and platitudes about “making a difference” and it’s all just another way of saying “power”.

    Fine – a necessary evil – but if you want to legislate what I can and cannot do, then don’t expect to go unchallenged.

    If that puts you off, great :) I saved you a wrong turn.

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  18. God you’re a bore, Arana.

    Talk about euphemisms – all your waffle about absolute power corrupting and “speaking truth to power” is smug tripe disguised as experience.

    These are kids interesting in politics as an engine of change. They’re enthusiastic and want to make a difference. Who are you to tell them they can’t offer anything?

    Leon Trotsky started changing the world at the age of 17.
    Pitt he Younger was Prime Minister at 24.
    What have you done?

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  19. Who are you to tell them they can’t offer anything?

    It’s possible, but as your answers illustrate – statistically highly unlikely. Else we’d have a lot more 17 year olds running the show.

    Look, good luck to them. If that’s what they really want to do it, then I’m hardly likely to stop them, am I. However, I’m not sure why there’s this paternalistic mothering going on if your faith in them is strong.

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  20. It’s possible, but as your answers illustrate – statistically highly unlikely. Else we’d have a lot more 17 year olds running the show

    That has to be one of your more pathetic strawmen to date.

    However, I’m not sure why there’s this paternalistic mothering going on if your faith in them is strong.

    What “paternalist mothering”? Mentoring? Offering guidance? What a strange Manichean world you live in where people appear fully formed with idea already populated in their heads.

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  21. That has to be one of your more pathetic strawmen to date.

    Makes me wonder why you introduced it.

    What “paternalist mothering”?

    Apparently I’m “ruining their chance” by suggesting they come back to it once they’ve experienced more of life.

    In any case, this is what politics is about, isn’t it? A war of ideas? Debate? Cut ‘n thrust?

    Or is it just about playtime in the house? Sitting in the PMs? chair? Fluffy bunnies?

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  22. “paternalistic mothering”

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

    Are you George W Bush?

    John Key?

    Good grief! Paternalistic mothering!

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  23. What does “ruining their chance” mean? “rain on their party”?

    Sounds rather paternalistic and protective to me.

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  24. Are you sure you understand the concept of strawman, Arana?

    You make a proposition – A: kids know nothing, and can add nothing to political discourse because they posess no life experience.

    I make a counter proposition – B: historical examples of young people who have made an enormous political impact.

    You counter with “Statistically B is unlikely as a subset of the population, then A is proven.

    Strawman 101. You need to come up with something more meaningful than a logical fallacy.

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  25. Not quite.

    It’s possible a very young person can make a great contribution to politics. Just highly unlikely.

    Youth has many advantages. Be free. Explore. Live. Then come back to politics once you’ve done a lot of all three :)

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  26. Be free. Explore. Live.

    Or for some people “Live your ideals. Stay focused. Live.”

    And don’t let people tell you “you can’t”.

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  27. Arana says “Then come back to politics once you’ve done a lot of all three”

    That’s where the Greens have a very serious weakness – virtually
    - zero economic experience,
    - zero business experience,
    - zero investing experience, and
    - not even many jobs in the the private sector, even when you count ALL Green MPs.

    And if they want to be more than a fringe party, they need to get Green MPs with much more of this sort of experience.

    That way more people would take the Greens more seriously, and they wouldn’t be so likely to come up with hastily made nutty “policy”.

    Or have bizarrely optimistic claims of how “green jobs” could transform the NZ economy and make us a global leader.

    Or have the embarrassment of Metiria trying to tell the country’s top business leaders what’s best for their businesses.

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  28. And don’t let people tell you “you can’t”.

    Not saying they “can’t”. If they want to do so, I’m not stopping them.

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  29. And if they want to be more than a fringe party, they need to get Green MPs with much more of this sort of experience.

    Quite right. It’s my point, really. I doubt the Greens would listen to anyone who professed to be a leader on organics, yet had never been in a garden, or grown anything, but had read a jolly good book about it. Well, half a book. Okay, looked at the pictures.

    So why should the business community listen to the Greens?

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  30. Have any Green MPs had business experience, do you know, Arana?

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  31. Business experience needs to be presented in any political forum yes, but that does not make experience in business the single most important criteria for anyone to be able to contribute to the common good. Surely a diversity of experience and viewpoints in people willing to listen to each other lead to a more holistic outcome. If the entire cabinet is mostly representing one sector of society such as business one would have unbalanced policies – internationally examples are not rare.

    The youth can contribute a unique perspective and a fresh open analysis, no-one is appointing them over millions, we are simply welcoming their contribution. The sooner they get experience in what they want to do, the sooner they might get good at it.

    If you are saying one has to be in business a long time before you can contribute meaningfully to politics, then one would likewise also need to be experienced in many other diverse fields politicians influence like parenting, being an ecological expert, policing, social work, and such. Business advice is not the primary reason people vote for political parties. They have wide ranging concerns around society and their families. Many very successful change agents in politics worldwide did not have business experience. Business motivation is as a rule profit, good politicians are often driven by other motivations.

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  32. I think DPF sums it up well:

    “Already this year, Mayor Celia Wade-Brown has revealed she had no idea that up to $350,000 had been budgeted to house her in temporary offices while the council chambers were earthquake-proofed. How did she and other councillors find out? They read about it on the front page of this newspaper.

    That was a damning admission.

    With this level of competence from a Green Mayor, imagine what fun we may have with six Green Cabinet Ministers?”

    The Greens seem to very down on Devoy for not having the “right” qualifications. To think, all that fuss is over a ceremonial, non-job like RRC, not a cabinet role. Would the Greens listen to Devoy on race matters?

    I doubt it.

    So when the Greens talk about economics and business, I feel the same way. It sounds like a teenager reciting something they heard. You can tell there’s little or no direct experience, so the mistakes and poor judgement soon reveal themselves.

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  33. Actually, you do have a point, Arana.

    Imagine having someone running the country who forgets whether or not he knows someone, whether he had breakfast with them, or called them, then remembers he has their number in their phone, or makes such nonsensical statements as “Well he’s one academic, and like lawyers I can give you another one that will give a counterview.”

    This is a pretty damning example of either a pathological liar who is out of their depth, or someone suffering some form of acute mental illness. Imagine what it would be like having someone like that in a Cabinet role or higher!

    Could they possibly be trusted or taken seriously?

    I doubt it.

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  34. People may question Key’s recollection of trivial events, but few could credibly question his knowledge and authority to speak on matters fiscal.

    No one rises to the global head of foreign exchange at Merrill Lynch, or is a member of the Foreign Exchange Committee of the New York Federal Reserve Bank without being world class in their field.

    No one.

    That’s why Key can speak authoritatively on such matters, and why people will listen to him.

    It’s also the reason few will listen to unqualified political activist MPs – or children – on such matters.

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  35. “People may question Key’s recollection of trivial events,(Yes! We do, thank you, and find it unbelievable, his claims that he “Can’t recall”. He’s not playing with a straight bat.) but few could credibly question his knowledge and authority to speak on matters fiscal. (Half the country questions his credibility there. His asset sales stuff-up is the perfect example of the actions of a money-man without a clue as to what a country needs. He’s “Lynching” us all because it’s all he knows how to do).

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  36. Arana said:
    “I think DPF sums it up well”

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

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  37. Again, Arana – Have any Green MPs had business experience, do you know?

    It’s an important question. Hope you’ve the fortitude to answer it.

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  38. No one rises to the global head of foreign exchange at Merrill Lynch, or is a member of the Foreign Exchange Committee of the New York Federal Reserve Bank without being world class in their field.

    Sure. This eminently qualifies him to be a money trader.
    But who would suggest that being a very successful speculative gambler automatically qualifies an individual for being a head of state?

    No one.

    How often is a head of state asked to comment on money trading and speculation?

    Never.

    He’s no ore “qualified” to be the PM than I am.

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  39. Half the country questions his credibility there

    Half the country couldn’t tell you the difference between a dividend and an imputation credit. Offer them a free pony, they’ll vote for it.

    Have any Green MPs had business experience, do you know?

    Not on the profiles I’ve seen, but I’m sure you’ll dig something out from one or two.

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  40. Sure. This eminently qualifies him to be a money trader.

    It qualifies him as a lot more than that. Anyone with an internet connection can be a money trader. Very few people could be global head of foreign exchange at Merrill Lynch.

    It requires deep strategic and management skill. That is objective, measurable fact.

    People who deride it appear to either know nothing of the role, or simply demonise it because it suits their politics.

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  41. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

    One of your deeper arguments, certainly.

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  42. If you’re certain that there are Green MPs with business experience, why do you ask, “So why should the business community listen to the Greens?”
    Are you, like your dresses-the-same playmate, photonz1, just blowing, or is it that you take your talking-points from ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha hafarrar?

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  43. Oh, and you are correct to expect me to affirm that there are.
    There are :-)

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  44. People who deride it appear to either know nothing of the role, or simply demonise it because it suits their politics.

    People who talk up the role of what is essentially gambling into a science are no better.

    Don’t get me wrong – I’m not demonising Key for his former profession. He made a mint and was at the top of his field. Good on him.

    But I do take exception to your framing his success in one area and equating it to his suitability for another, while simultaneously opining that experts in another field – as unrelated as money trading is to politics – couldn’t possibly be competent to hold down a political role.

    You can’t have it both ways.

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  45. If you’re certain that there are Green MPs with business experience, why do you ask, “So why should the business community listen to the Greens?”

    Not sure why any MP would choose to hide it.

    Norman often speaks on matters economic. He doesn’t talk with much authority on the topic, in my view, mostly because his background doesn’t include economics or finance. I’m sure he’s an expert on the Alliance Party, however.

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  46. She believes she can, Gregor, and will continue to assert the Key’s fantastically well qualified to be PM. In my opinion, Key’s little behind-the-scenes helpers are very well qualified to install whosoever they choose into the role of PM and Key is well qualified to follow their instructions as to how to retain the role. His own strategic abilities though, seem weak, quite frankly and when isolated from his advisers, he stuffs up regularly. Should I list examples? Take too long.

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  47. Just as you, Arana, with zero real-time experience of the Green Party, spout forth on their business endlessly, in a spectacularly shallow way, convinced none-the-less that your view is a valid one.
    Excuse me, I have to laugh.

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

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  48. People who talk up the role of what is essentially gambling into a science are no better.

    I used to work for Warburg Dillon Read and BNP Paribas in London. To get anywhere in such organizations, you must have the skills. To be a good trader – and you can’t be a bad one, as they fire you – you need to be able to analyze a lot of data quickly. It’s demanding, the hours are long, and if you don’t perform – you’re out. The data doesn’t lie.

    These environments are not nice, supportive and and friendly. They are cut-throat. Top traders have massive egos and pay checks to match. Anyone who rises to the top of FOREX and manages such people is no lightweight.

    I can’t imagine a harder job. PM, perhaps.

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  49. But I do take exception to your framing his success in one area and equating it to his suitability for another, while simultaneously opining that experts in another field – as unrelated as money trading is to politics – couldn’t possibly be competent to hold down a political role.

    You may not like Key, but I think it’s an observable fact he relates well to a wide variety of people. He’s got a personality that resonates with many people.

    This is backed by his experience in finance at a time when people are concerned about global financial instability.

    Finally, he can clearly manage difficult people, just as Clark did before him. The National Party, with the occasional co*-up, is a pretty tight ship.

    I’d say the Greens are pretty well managed, too. Labour are currently a disaster.

    So, he is qualified for his role. He’s not just a “money trader” any more than Delahunty is just a sheep shearer.

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  50. “Top traders have massive egos”
    There ya go.
    Who’d want to be lead by someone hindered by one of those?

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  51. Any way, Key – what a bore.

    These young Greens look interesting though. I bet each and everyone of them has a sharp memory and a real understanding of envirnoment and social justice issues.

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  52. Who’d want to be lead by someone hindered by one of those?

    Politicians tend to, as well. You’ve got to have a massive ego to think you know better than others and can therefore tell them what to do.

    Often, when it comes to politicians, it’s misplaced, of course.

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  53. Who’d want to be lead by someone hindered by one of those?

    They sound like they’re parroting empty cliches to me. What is “100% self-sustainability as a nation”, anyway?

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  54. Excuse me, I have to laugh. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

    You sound rather like an old dear who’s just been given her evening gin :)

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  55. You may not like Key, but I think it’s an observable fact he relates well to a wide variety of people. He’s got a personality that resonates with many people.

    I don’t particularly like Key because he’s a shifty liar. He might be a great guy but that’s not the point.

    Furthermore, I don’t think he particularly relates to people at all. Key is a highly polished, focus-grouped PR package. You very rarely see the real man in a public setting. As with most people, you see the real Key when he’s on the back foot, and IMO it’s not pretty. He comes across as particularly graceless and thin skinned under fire.

    Moreover, can you not see the disconnect between your own statements “[The trading environment is] cut-throat. Top traders have massive egos and pay checks to match. Anyone who rises to the top of FOREX and manages such people is no lightweight.” and “He relates well to a wide variety of people. He’s got a personality that resonates with many people.”

    Cut-throat, ruthlessly focussed, born-to-rule, ego-maniacs have personalities that resonate well with people? Only when they’re faking it. A useful skill in politics, most definitely.

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  56. He wouldn’t have got the nickname “The Smiling Assassin” for nothing. His leadership is popular because he can make the hard calls that go with being PM and do so in a reassuring manner. Lange was similar in that respect.

    His popularity ratings are very high for a PM, so it’s an observable fact many New Zealanders can relate to him. Meanwhile, you’ve got one party in parliament who can’t even convince *one* electorate to do so.

    What does that make them?

    Nowhere near Keys league, certainly.

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  57. His popularity ratings have been high. He fakes his bonhomie. Many people are taken in. Arana is taken in. Gregor is not. I am not. It’s a very curious thing, watching people go gooey around a man who has dead-fish eyes. Some can see it, others cannot.

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  58. His popularity ratings have been high. He fakes his bonhomie

    You’re not going to like anyone who is head of the National Party.

    Key is as genuine as most politicians. There’s always a fair degree of front, of course.

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  59. While I think you are almost completely wrong in the Lange-Key comparison – Lange was somewhat of an intellectual, Key is antoi-intellectual, Lange was a superb rhetorician, Key isn’t, Lange’s life was one of uninterrupted public service, Key’s hasn’t been – it does raise an interesting point.

    Both men are/were populists, controlled by others.

    Lange said it best himself “I got there in terms of the Labour Party for all the wrong reasons, for all the reasons which weren’t part of its tradition. I’d never been a tract writer; I’d never been a philosopher; I’d never taken part in extraordinary industrial dispute activism; I’d not been in any of that background but I was able to mix it in what had become, conceived to be, the new front line of politics – the ability on television to convey confidence and assurance without saying anything. “

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  60. Key is as genuine as a counterfeit bill (sorry about the pun, Mr English).

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  61. “You’re not going to like anyone who is head of the National Party.”

    I had breakfast with Don Brash.
    Didn’t like him.

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  62. I’m not likening him on those grounds anymore than I’m likening them on weight grounds.

    They have a common touch. There’s an everyman quality about them. Most MPs do not have it and can’t even fake it. They both made tough calls and did so in a reassuring way. Many politicians are incapable of doing so.

    That is the main reason they are (were) party leaders.

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  63. And as explained above, that where I think you are wrong.

    Key’s common touch is pure marketing. It must be, given that his entire life has been about excising his past – poor kid, solo mum – to self acualise at a Titan of Capital.

    He turns on the blokey bonhomie when he’s kissing hands and shaking babies, grifting for votes. It’s fake and it’s slightly distasteful, but it is politics – and the Nats need it because they have no-one else that can sell a story to voters that is fundamentally against their own long term self interest.

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  64. Key’s common touch is pure marketing. It must be, given that his entire life has been about excising his past – poor kid, solo mum – to self acualise at a Titan of Capital.

    I have met John Key, and I find him genuine. He is a nice bloke. That doesn’t mean he isn’t capable of making the hard calls one needs in that job. A lot of top executives have that “duality”, for want of a better word i.e. you can’t be mister nice guy all the time, even if that’s your true nature.

    and the Nats need it because they have no-one else that can sell a story to voters that is fundamentally against their own long term self interest.

    It isn’t. People want economic growth, jobs, wealth, opportunity and all those things National stand for. They do not want “environment first”, no/low growth as can be seen in your numbers – barely above 10%.

    You’re **way** out of touch with everyman/woman NZ. Key understands them – the Greens do not, else they’d have Nationals vote levels.

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  65. It isn’t. People want economic growth, jobs, wealth, opportunity and all those things National stand for.

    If they stand for these things why do we have a stagnant economy, persistent structural unemployment, low wages and a government that presides over the enrichment of the few at the expense of the many?

    I think you must live in a fairytale NZ Arana if you think this government has delivered on anything they ostensibly promote.

    They do not want “environment first”, no/low growth as can be seen in your numbers – barely above 10%

    You clearly have learned nothing from being on this blog about what the GP stands for either. It’s never been environment first at the expense of all else. You are merely showing your ignorance.

    You’re **way** out of touch with everyman/woman NZ. Key understands them – the Greens do not, else they’d have Nationals vote levels.

    Funny, because I am ‘everyman’.
    Large mortgage, 2 kids, heavy taxes incl. student loan, breadwinner. I doubt the $50m-man “understands” me one jot, other than what his focus groups tell him are my hot button issues.

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  66. So, the reason the Greens can’t even get elected in ONE constituency seat – election after election, nationwide, is…..what? Rogue polling? The voters don’t know what they want?

    The voters know what they want and it isn’t you. They don’t like you or your policies. Your policies appeal to hippies, children, neo-Marxists and comfortable middle-class Chardonnay sipping luvvies who don’t understand how their bread is buttered.

    That isn’t everyman.

    And it shows in the election results, time and again.

    National have a GFC to deal with, and an earthquake. NZ is not in bad financial shape, considering. Could it be better? Yes. If only National would stop being so timid and take the handbrake off.

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  67. Arana

    So, the reason the Greens can’t even get elected in ONE constituency seat – election after election, nationwide, is…..what? Rogue polling? The voters don’t know what they want?

    C’mon Arana, even you can’t be that dumb!

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  68. She is. She met Key and liked him. He’s nice.
    The Greens are the third-biggest political party in New Zealand and their influence continues to grow apace because, according to Arana (Love you Mr Key, love what you do but I’m a Dunne girl, chaste and reasonable)the voters don’t know what they want.
    Oh yes, Jackal. She is.

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  69. No Arana. The Greens have won an electorate seat. A blue one, in 1996.
    It seems likely that the reason that they haven’t won one since is that they decided it is a more effective use of resources to target the list vote than it is to try to win an electorate seat. As there seems to be a very low risk of the Greens falling below the 5% threshold and actually needing an electorate seat to remain a viable force in parliament, it looks like a sensible strategy. Pretending you don’t understand this makes you appear naive.

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  70. She’s not pretending, Armchair Critic. That’s as far as this girl’s thinking goes.
    The extraordinary success (14 MPs, is it?) of the Greens, their strategy and support must have Arana deeply puzzled. After all, no one accepts Green stupidity, do they? No. Just enough people to install the third-biggest political party with 14 MPs and a very real chance of being in Government in 2014.
    Run by me again will you, Arana, how the Libertarian Party fared…ever.

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  71. No Arana. The Greens have won an electorate seat. A blue one, in 1996.

    Wow. That really trumps Key and National, doesn’t it.

    So, it you think Key is out of touch, then what are you? If, just for one minute, you can put aside your monumental arrogance and see things as they really are, then it’s obvious, from the poll and election results, that Key does resonate with everyman NZ and you do not, and never have.

    And then you might ask why.

    Do you think you’re above them?

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  72. It seems likely that the reason that they haven’t won one since is that they decided it is a more effective use of resources to target the list vote than it is to try to win an electorate seat.

    So, on that basis, Russel would never run for an electorate seat? Oh, but when he does – that different, huh.

    Okay, have it your way. Why do roughly 90% of NZ not party vote Green?

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  73. You think you’re so smart, whilst being so obviously blind and stupid.

    The left never got why George Bush was popular. He was fallible. He made mistakes. He talked like the guy next door.

    He was not above you.

    And that’s the key. Or should I say, the Key.

    Key, a multi-millionaire, is a master of positioning himself just vulnerable and error-prone enough so that people feel he’s just like them. And they forgive him for it, just as they forgive their mates. He is like their mates. Therefore, he is their mate.

    The left thought themselves so smart about Bush, which blinded them to what was staring them in the face. I didn’t like Bush, either, but his voter appeal was obvious.

    Unless you’re so convinced of your own inherent “smartness”, it has rendered you stupid.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2 (-1)

  74. No Arana, it does not trump Key and co. It shows that when you ask why the Greens can’t win ONE electorate seat, election after election (and that’s exactly what you did today at 2:29pm) you showed you don’t know what you are talking about. Ignorance like that does your credibility no good.
    Thanks for asking about me. Since I’m not a politician, there’s a good reason why I don’t resonate with “everyman” and since I don’t represent the Green party, it’s kind of weird that you are asking. Of course, if you just want to call me names, have the courage to go ahead and do it.
    I understand why both GW Bush and Key are popular. The reasons you suggest are correct, but are primary school level. It’s a bit more than that.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 (+2)

  75. It shows that when you ask why the Greens can’t win ONE electorate seat, election after election

    I understand it. They are going for the party vote. And why are they going for the party vote? Because they can’t win electorate seats. Why can’t they win election seats? Because few people can relate to the Greens.

    If they thought they could win them, they’d be in boots and all.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  76. Why can’t they win election seats? Because few people can relate to the Greens.

    That settled then. I guess we can all go back to sleep now, completely discounting the impact of the advantages of incumbency, tribal voting, partisan bias, the media, and money.

    Phew! Democracy is safe…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  77. That settled then. I guess we can all go back to sleep now, completely discounting the impact of the advantages of incumbency, tribal voting, partisan bias, the media, and money.

    Divert blame all you like, but the Greens have been going – what – over 20 years now?

    Perhaps, just maybe, you don’t have a message people are interested in and you select people to stand who few people can relate to.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  78. And the effect of blatant pro National, pro neo-liberal, propaganda in the media.

    Even with all that on their side, ACT gets how much of the vote, again?

    Which makes it even more un-democratic when National largely follows ACT policy.

    Policies less than a 2%, lunatic fringe, vote for.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  79. And the effect of blatant pro National, pro neo-liberal, propaganda in the media.

    WTF? Seriously, WTF? Journalism, with rare exception, is wall-to-wall left and envirofetishists. How many New Zealand journalists question AGW orthodoxy?

    Even with all that on their side, ACT gets how much of the vote, again?

    ACT are irrelevant.

    Which makes it even more un-democratic when National largely follows ACT policy.

    You must be living in a different dimension. National have continued Labour policy in most instances. National are pretty much Labour Lite and nowhere near ACT.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  80. 14 MPs, Arana. 14 MPs. That must hurt. You voted for Dunne-Party-of-one. One. The party that truly represents your political ideology has NONE at all. You seem not a little jealous of the Greens terrific result. You are embarrassing youself with your anti-Green rant.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 3 (0)

  81. The Greens are the least successful political party in living memory. In 20 years, they’ve never been in government.

    Dunne, meanwhile, has been in most governments since 1984, and held a number of senior roles. More recently, he’s also held the deciding vote. I don’t agree with much of his politics, but the guy makes your 14 MPS look like amateurs.

    Ohh, that’s got to burn, ‘Fly. Way less politically successful and powerful than Peter Dunne.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  82. Arana. You come to Frogblog to belittle the Green Party, her MPs, green supporters, those who vote green and share the Green Party’s ideals. You decry our ideas, call our elected representatives ‘amateurs’ and generally decry everything we do.
    Would it be innapropriate for me to suggest that you just f*ck off?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 3 (0)

  83. Why does anyone bother to engage with Arana and Photonz at all? It’s quite clear that they have no real interest in environmental sustainability or social responsibility – it’s a waste of time and energy and it makes these forums really tedious to read. Talk about constructive, useful stuff and ignore them.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  84. Scroll back up. Read you own comments.

    You attack me, then can’t take the push-back in reply. If you don’t want push-back, don’t attack me.

    If you want to act like a bully, then so be it, but at least have the fortitude not to start whining like a spoiled brat. If you want a civil discussion, then remain civil.

    Choice is yours.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 (+3)

  85. The Green Party must be so proud of their Southland representative Greenfly, as he sets such a fantastic example to the Youth Green MPs of what you need to do to be a Green Party representative…..

    i.e. be the most abusive person on frogblog, then whinge and whine about abuse, then say “just f*ck off”…..and indulge in intellectual debate like…..

    “- pure fantasy, nonsense yabber, silly chatter from a foolish wee chap who should stick to subjects he has at least passing knowledge of.
    - bogus, simple-minded, boorish, dull, feeble, wan, laughable, sad and reflects badly on you
    - Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!
    - credibility just evaporated altogether
    - Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!
    - little man
    - pure fantasy
    - You’re so rattled
    - Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha
    - making you break out in hives. Most enjoyable to observe.
    - pure fantasy.
    - chicken-little naysayer, such as yourself,
    - it really rips your undies!”

    What a fantastic representative of the Green Party….

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 (+1)

  86. +1 on the f*ck off.

    Another role model, kids. Watch and learn.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 (+2)

  87. slkta says “+1 on the f*ck off.”

    Another fine display on the page celebrating school kids.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  88. WTF? Seriously, WTF? Journalism, with rare exception, is wall-to-wall left and envirofetishists.

    I’ll have whatever you’re smoking, Arana.
    Clearly mindbending stuff if you think any of the mainstream press in NZ is anything other than right-centrist (which doesn’t preclude an acceptance of AGW by the way which is essentially a non-political topic, aside from how one might respond to it). Either that or you don’t even vaguely understand the political landscape in NZ.

    Do you actually read – let alone believe – what you type before you reply?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 3 (-1)

  89. Thank you solkta and thank you Janine, your suggestion is a very sound one and I’m going to take it up. Perhaps Photonz1 and Arana are like the warts on Nanny McPhee’s face – only when determined kindness and firmness are the norm in how we do business with each other, do they disappear. Photonz1 has made a great collection of quotes though. I’d hate him to leave and take those with him.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1 (-1)

  90. My favourite:
    “credibility just evaporated altogether”
    Don’t ever use this wicked phrase, young greens!

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 (0)

  91. Thank you solkta and thank you Janine, your suggestion is a very sound one and I’m going to take it up.

    I recall you’ve made that same declaration in the past. I wonder how many hours this latest declaration will last?

    Face facts. You love the Fly n’ Arana n’ Photonz show.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  92. Hi. I’m Arana.
    Thank you for having me here on your Green blog.
    The Greens are the least successful political party in living memory.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 2 (+5)

  93. I’ll let you stay. I’m good like that.

    I welcome debate and views that differ from my own.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  94. Hi. I’m photonz1.
    Thank you for having me here on your Green blog.
    You are stupid. Your leader is incompetent. You are fools.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 2 (+3)

  95. “You love the Fly n’ Arana n’ Photonz show.”

    I do, Arana, but I also know others dislike it intensely, find it boorish and pointless and stop reading threads once we start to bicker. I’m not sure why you can’t see that I’m simply mirroring your and photonz1′s boorish behaviour, your insults to everyone here and your general ‘dissing’ of the Greens, but there’s something in you that justifies it somehow. It’s very difficult for me not to at least try to point out to you what how it is you are behaving but it’s not working – both of you incandesce when I pour petrol on you – I wonder what I’m doing wrong :-)
    Best thing, rather than try not to out-do you in boorish behaviour, is to leave altogether – difficult but possible. I do like to play with words though and compiling graphic insults of the amusing sort is a hobby of mine and you and p are just too easy to lampoon. That said, I choose out. (As you point out, I’m not good at staying away, but I’ll certainly try :-)

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  96. I suspect you’re used to an environment where those who surround you all sing from the same songsheet, so opposing views may sound “boorish”.

    Quite frankly, you accusing others of infantile behavior is a bit rich. You set the tone, then act surprised when you get push-back.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 (+1)

  97. Re Arana comments on this site – I think the responsibility of all comments on all sites lies with the moderator who should moderate all comments so that arguments (in the best sense of the word) move forward and present points of views that help the reader come to their own conclusions. For instance, if a point has been made, why have a comment that repeats it. If people go off topic, or abusive or simply are not adding any comment that aids the conversation, then don’t include them. This is good journalist practice. Sadly, even on sites like Stuff, the aim is simply to encourage a good stoush as if the more people who take part in a war of words, the better it is. Time for Moderators to actually moderate.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 (+1)

  98. From Arana whose main debating tactic is, I do not believe it, because. “I do not believe it”.

    Or secondly “I know nothing about this, But, I am sure no one else does either, but I believe they believe, from equal ignorance”.

    Amusing, but not really debate.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 3 (-1)

  99. Kerry says “Amusing, but not really debate.”

    And making up total nonsense, like claiming food prices have gone up 20% in just one year, is real debate?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2 (-1)

  100. The cut. The thrust. The stealthy pirouette. The lunge. The counter.

    It’s all a bit of harmless, democratic fun :)

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2 (-1)

  101. About power company investment, don’t you mean.

    Still arguing about something I did not say, Photo.

    I said the food that poor people can afford went up, as you well know.
    We all know that the price of steak, caviar and epicure cheeese went down during that time. And baked beans and potatoes went up.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  102. The media is all center-right. I got a good laugh out of that one :)

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  103. photonz1 says “And making up total nonsense, like claiming food prices have gone up 20% in just one year, is real debate?”

    Kerry proves he’ll say anything no matter how false …”Still arguing about something I did not say, Photo.”

    Here’s kerry’s quote from October 2012, word for word…”The real world is more concerned with the 20% rise in grocery prices since October 2011″

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  104. My Goodness…
    All of these comments…
    I really do question what Arana does for a living, other than recommending myself and the colleagues that I have the pleasure in working in the near future – that we should:

    Run. Enjoy the sun. Travel. Experience life. Come back to it, if you must

    All I have as a response, is that if myself, my colleagues and the many other declared Youth MP’s in their respected parties want to get involved in our country’s democratic process, by having this opportunity to see how things operate – while meeting the people who make the decisions; getting a close up view, then let us be with our aspirations. Let us do what we want to do and contribute to our society.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 1 (+3)

  105. Laugh away, Arana.
    Or you can provide an example – any NZ paper of record or TV channel will do – that espouses consistently leftist views away from the current neo-lib orthodoxy.

    Happy hunting.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  106. Stuff, NZHerald, TVNZ, TV3…

    It’s like Helen never left.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 5 (-3)

  107. Your just naming news outlets.
    Demonstrate how they are left wing. You’ve made the claim.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1 (-1)

  108. Photo is so desperate to spin that allowing stealing our assets and then letting billions in profits go offshore, from overcharging for power, is a good idea, he is even resorting to quoting out of context from totally unrelated discussions that are long past.

    Not to mention claiming deferred maintenance, and improving security of supply, which was required by Labour after several blackouts, also caused by deferred maintenance, by power companies, as new investment.

    Of course, deferring maintenance is a common trick of our accountants promoted to overpaid management positions beyound their competence level.
    It makes the books look better for just long enough for them to move on to something higher paid.

    Just FYI Photo, it is clear to everyone else, except you, in the discussion about food prices, that I was talking about the real world of groceries that low and middle income people buy. The baked beans, rice and potatos world real people inhabit. Not your fantasy world where everyone buys Anchor milk and eye fillet (The things that did go down in price). The key words are “in the real world”.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1 (-1)

  109. Kerry says ‘he is even resorting to quoting out of context from totally unrelated discussions that are long past.”

    Just showing that you continually make stuff up.

    You’ve just proved it again, when you say potatoes have gone up, when in fact the food price index says potatoes went down by 10% over the 12 month period.

    Kerry calls the following is “deferred maintenence”
    - building a whole second tailrace at Manapouri, and installing new turbines with a a much greater output, is only “deferred maintenance.
    - building windfarms all across the country
    - spending half a billion dollars in a new geothermal plant
    - a half billion upgrade to Hunty that massively increases it’s output

    Just several more examples that you’ll make up any nonsense.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  110. I said new investment is nowhere near 9 billion.

    All your examples do not add up.

    You cannot prove it is that high because it is not. Any good look at the power company books will show you that a lot of the so called new investment was either maintenance or work required to meet the later rules for security of supply. They had to be made to invest by regulation, Photo.

    Repeating self interested BS from power company execs in the Herald does not make it true.

    Just because jerks like Heffernan are crying into their wine glass as they see the big share options and bonuses, from ripping us off with inflated power prices, may not happen.

    Representatives of businesses that actually make things for export, those that really are entrepreneurial, are rather happy about lower costs for power.

    Here is a list for Photo

    Why do you support:
    The selling of assets which will earn income way beyond the selling price for decades to come.
    Loss of control of Essential infrastructure.
    Higher power prices making our export businesses less competitive.
    Higher costs for all other business.
    Increase in our current account deficit from even more offshoring of profit and interest.
    Even more money lost/borrowed to playing financial games with existing assets, rather than investment in the new sustainable productive business and infrastructure we need.

    Supporting that takes either greed or blind ideological stupidity.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 2 (-2)

  111. Kerry says “I said new investment is nowhere near 9 billion. All your examples do not add up.”

    Crown Monitoring unit gives the following numbers for purchase of assets over the last decade
    $3.125b – Meridian
    $1.695b – Mighty River Power
    $2.232b – Genesis
    +
    $2.500 – Contact (5 years only)

    $9.552 billion total (still excluding Trustpower and 5 years of Contact spending).

    Then you can add $5 billion of additional charges from Transpower for National Grid upgrades, which power companies also have to pass on.

    So there’s $14.5 billion of extra costs (equivalent to $8,500 per household over 10 years) not counting several other legitimate and significant reasons for power increases.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 (+1)

  112. @Arana: “The Greens are the least successful political party in living memory. In 20 years, they’ve never been in government.

    I really don’t care about engaging the trolls on this one, but for me a big measure of success of the Green Party has been in the indirect effect it’s had on the policies of other parties. It hasn’t needed to be in Cabinet to affect how other politicians think.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 (+2)

  113. coreyfuimaono: Congratulations to you and all of the Youth MP’s and your qualities and aspirations, and your wish to see how the system operates, and to learn how to contribute.
    Could it be that these intelligent, eyes-wide-open young people might just see-through a great deal of what happens, and formulate as time goes on, some really appropriate, honest policies geared to the good of the threatened environment, the good of the people and their children and the future. (Not just ‘matey’ and focused almost entirely on supposed economic “solutions”) Sorry if that sounds cynical.
    Meanwhile, Youth M.P.’s, don’t feel TOO obligated to save the world – the rest of us have the responsibility, also, and are right behind you and your hopes for the future. So at least ENJOY this experience coming up for you! LOL

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

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