Kevin Hague
Police move to protect cyclists

In 2011, I discovered that the Police were failing in their duty of care to cyclists when it came to policing bicycle safety. The Police weren’t keeping any meaningful records on bicycle accidents reported by the public on their Community Roadwatch site. Now that’s changed:

This small addition will make the world of difference to cyclists and their future safety; the Police can better manage what they now measure.

This is a small win for cyclists and I promise to keep an eye on the developing trends to ensure the Police are adequately enforcing road safety to protect vulnerable road users like cyclists and pedestrians.

Pedal safely this year using the Roadwatch website to report poor driver behaviour. And don’t forget to explore some of the new great rides we’ve been rolling out of late as part of Nga Haerenga – the New Zealand Cycle Trail.

Kevin

 

13 thoughts on “Police move to protect cyclists

  1. What we really need is an ability to report cyclists. Given they don’t have plates, that’s a bit hard to do.

    In the last 18 hours I’ve seen one go through a red light causing a driver to be required to do an emergency stop to not flatten her, and another riding along a busy 60KMH road with hands in pockets.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 7 (+2)

  2. If you want to improve the behaviour of road users I think it would be an excellent idea if you tried, (private members bill perhaps?), to institute the requirement that cycles be registered and display a number plate.
    I see far more cases of incredibly dangerous behaviour by cyclists that I do by motorists.
    I was travelling home this morning, in Wellington, when I stopped at a pedestrian crossing to allow an elderly man to cross from my right. Another car also stopped behind me. He stated crossing the road and was about three-quarters of the way across and in front of my car when a cyclist, travelling at nearly 50 kph, passed me on my left and just missed the pedestrian. He, the cyclist, appeared to shout some abuse at a person who had total right-of-way on the crossing and then kept going at high speed.
    If only he had some form of registration on the bike I would definitely have reported him to the police. In his anonymous condition of course there was nothing I could do.
    As you must see in Wellington it is far more the cyclists who are sinning than being sinned against. The average cyclist obviously cannot read, as they do not seem to know what the word STOP is, and they are clearly colour-blind as the don’t see RED stop lights. They also don’t seem to understand that they are meant to ride on the road rather than on the footpath.
    Incidentally I do own and ride a bicycle. I just do it in places that are safer than the narrow Wellington streets.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 9 (-3)

  3. The idea that cyclists break the rules and so deserve to be run over is the same kind of reasoning that leads to people conclude that scantily clad women deserve to be raped. After all, the ‘scantily’ clad women broke the rules about ‘proper’ dress, didn’t she?

    Don’t blame the victim.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 6 (0)

  4. @rimu.
    I can only assume that you are referring to what dbuckley or I posted.
    Neither of us said anything that implied that we thought it alright to run over cyclists and it is complete stupidity on your part to then, in effect, to accuse us of approving of rape.
    Your remark comes into the totally offensive and wilfully crass category.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 3 (+3)

  5. If you want to improve the behaviour of road users I think it would be an excellent idea if you tried, (private members bill perhaps?), to institute the requirement that cycles be registered and display a number plate

    I’d support this. As a frequent pedestrian in Wellington I’ve seen a lot of bad behavior by lycra-clad cretins who think the road rules don’t apply to them.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  6. oh dear…. I see the lovers of hate have found yet another outlet…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 (0)

  7. Just thought I’d run this one through spell checker:

    “If you want to improve the behaviour of road users I think it would be an excellent idea if you tried, (private members bill perhaps?), to institute the requirement that cycles be registered and display a number plate
    I’d support this. As a frequent pedestrian in Wellington I’ve seen a lot of bad behavior by lycra-clad cretins who think the road rules don’t apply to them.”

    it came back with this:

    If you want to improve the behaviour of road users I think it would be an excellent idea if you tried, (private members bill perhaps?), to institute the requirement that registered vehicles IE those with a number plate follow the rules in their 2 tonnes of steel. As a frequent pedestrian, motorist & occasional cyclist in Wellington I’ve seen a lot of bad behavior by cretins who think the road rules don’t apply to them.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 (0)

  8. Pedestrians don’t require registration either, but they’re capable of contributing to problems on the road if they jump out in front of vehicles at silly times, as happens frequently in cities (like Wellington). I don’t think this is a great argument for pedestrians to be registered. I also don’t support automatic ticketing for jaywalking (which I think is a useful and more efficient way of getting from one place to another in many circumstances) but I’d not object to ticketing of people who were unsafely crossing the road, such as by not waiting for suitable gaps in traffic when they don’t have the rightive way.

    Possibly there’s some merit for registration of some bikes under certain circumstances for use on certain types of roads, but if it’s done too harshly without a combined serious effort to improve cycling infrastructure, there’s a big trade-off in the accessibility and convenience of cycling to allow people to cheaply and efficiently get from one place to another. A key difference between cyclists and drivers is that drivers are controlling vehicles with massive amounts of momentum that can easily kill people if something goes wrong. There’s a much greater responsibility required from vehicle drivers, than anyone else, to be in total control of their vehicle and to be able to safely react to anything unexpected that occurs.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 (+4)

  9. Alwyn, I cycled to work in Wellington each day for four years until I moved away last year. In my experience, it was the minority of cyclists who behaved like the idiot you saw. Most were fine, and stopped at traffic lights, pedestrian crossings, etc. Its the same with car drivers. Its the minority giving the rest of them a bad name.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 (+2)

  10. In my experience, it was the minority of cyclists who behaved like the idiot you saw. Most were fine, and stopped at traffic lights, pedestrian crossings, etc.

    Do you know why we have traffic lights, pedestrian crossings, etc? Because of cars and the fact that cars are dangerous to everyone around them. Traffic lights are because of and for cars. Any cyclist that if forced to stop at a traffic light is having their choices limited by the choices made by car drivers.

    Fight oppression today – run a red light on your bike ;-)

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 3 (-2)

  11. I agree that cyclists should have number plates. However, the number of pedestrians using the roads/footpaths and the number of pedestiran injuries far exceed that of cyclists. They also don’t pay and road tax or separately contriute to ACC. So we should force all pedestrians to wear number plates and pay their registration fee before they are allowed to step on the footpath or road.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 (+1)

  12. The only reason roads need to be as massively maintained as they are is to accommodate vehicles with much higher requirements than cyclists and pedestrians, and many of our expensive roads have (over the years) usurped the passages that were easily usable by more lightweight forms of transport, but no longer are. It doesn’t make much sense to tax cyclists and pedestrians to subsidise vehicle requirements when cyclists and pedestrians are the people who have been deprived of their ability to get from place to place by the requirements if motorists. If anything the subsidy should be going the other way.

    Before considering if it’s rational for pedestrians our cyclists to be contributing to the ACC motor vehicle account, it’d be nice to see some data on how often they’re actually considered to be at fault. Eg. How often has a cyclist been in a significant accident caused by them riding into the back of a vehicle in front?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 (+1)

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