Podcast: Picnic for the Planet Highlights

Green Party Co-leader, Metiria Turei, delivered this year’s Picnic for the Planet speech in Wellington. This year’s Picnic marked a departure from the past. Firstly, it was held in Wellington away from the still sunny weather of the far North. Secondly, Metiria chose to talk predominately about social equity rather than turn the usual environmental spotlight on our nation. Here are the highlights of her speech.

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12 thoughts on “Podcast: Picnic for the Planet Highlights

  1. That’s the trouble, the Greens are no longer an environmental party – I’ve supported them since they started but feel the way they’re heading I won’t be able to vote for them at the next election. Time for an Environmental Party in New Zealand.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 7 (-6)

  2. Anne, do you mean a party that is prepared to go along with programmes that increase poverty, abbrogate democracy and give succour to international aggression as long as it promotes ecological sustainability?

    Sustainability through plutocracy, authoritarianism, and imperialism isn’t my cup of tea.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0 (+9)

  3. To echo Toad:
    Anne, the Green party has always been engaged in four charter principles, not just environmental issues.

    The charter is the founding document of The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand.

    The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand accepts Te Tiriti o Waitangi as the founding document of Aotearoa New Zealand; recognises Maori as Tangata Whenua in Aotearoa New Zealand; and commits to the following four Principles:

    Ecological Wisdom:
    The basis of ecological wisdom is that human beings are part of the natural world. This world is finite, therefore unlimited material growth is impossible. Ecological sustainability is paramount.
    Social Responsibility:
    Unlimited material growth is impossible. Therefore the key to social responsibility is the just distribution of social and natural resources, both locally and globally.
    Appropriate Decision-making:
    For the implementation of ecological wisdom and social responsibility, decisions will be made directly at the appropriate level by those affected.
    Non-Violence:
    Non-violent conflict resolution is the process by which ecological wisdom, social responsibility and appropriate decision making will be implemented. This principle applies at all levels.

    It is also available in maaori, here on the Green’s website:
    http://www.greens.org.nz/charter

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 1 (+5)

  4. Anne is part of a team of mischief-makers who would have us believe that they ‘used to vote Green, but won’t next time around’. They are fakes. Their claims are fake. I suppose it would be interesting to discover whether they are coordinating their meme, but, no, not interesting enough.
    All pushing to narrow the Greens activities and neutralise their effects in other areas.
    I guess ‘food safety’ would be an interesting field to challenge them on. Is food safety an environmental or a social issue? Or both?
    They’d have us abandon our very good activities there, because it’s ‘not a core, environmental issue’.
    Hah!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 0 (+8)

  5. ‘fly, it’s a bit like the ones who keep saying “I would vote for you if it weren’t for your industrial relations drugs trade income support immigration [insert policy here] policy.”

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 (+4)

  6. Anne, do you mean a party that is prepared to go along with programmes that increase poverty, abbrogate democracy and give succour to international aggression as long as it promotes ecological sustainability?

    Aye toad, and as though it were even possible to achieve ecological sustainability in those circumstances.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 (+3)

  7. Agreed Valis – that’s a lot of what got us into the poop we’re in in the first place – the attitude that if your resources are running out go and grab someone elses rather than looking to ways of utilisising them more sustainably.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 (+3)

  8. I always say to people who give me the regular line “I would vote for you if you just stuck to issues relating to environment”, “I kinda doubt you. I’m sure you could find other reasons not to vote for us if we did just that.”

    Does anyone have any better one-liners?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 (+2)

  9. Toad – you have their measure. I laugh in their faces! (sung to the tune of OMC’s ‘How Bizzare’)

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 (0)

  10. Having witnessed Met’s speach I found it among the strongest social justics speaches I have heard since the heydays of the early 1990s when the Unemployed and Beneficiaries Movement had a number of strong speakers, including Sue Bradford. She targetted the government’s increasingly strident and calculated attacks on the country’s poorest, perhaps as a softening up process to make fiscal attacks akin to what they announced on 19 December 1990. And for those lacking a sense of history, lookmit up.

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