World Bank Goes Green?

Sometimes something really good happens.

The World Bank has withdrawn funding for the palm oil sector including the Wilmar company that supplies [PDF] palm kernel to Fonterra. The World Bank is not satisfied that the palm plantations they loaned to in parts of the developing world met acceptable standards for sustainability. Congratulations to the Forest Peoples Programme and other groups such as Greenpeace for the excellent activism and lobbying on this issue.

As a forests campaigner I am delighted at any moves for reassessment by the funders of planet-wrecking. The wholesale destruction of tropical rainforests in places like Sumatra, Kalimantan and West Papua has accelerated since the rush to produce palm oil. Fonterra and New Zealand dairy farms are some of the largest customers for palm kernel on the planet, which is a co-product of the palm oil plantations. They need to stop and think about their responsibilities.

The illegal and unsustainable logging which precedes the plantations must stop.  The palm oil boom has made it even tougher to prevent the extinction of rare plants and animals which depend on tropical rainforest. Then there is the small matter of the 60 million indigenous people world wide who depend on the integrity of forest ecosystems. Rainforest destruction is our loss in terms of climate change and biodiversity, but forest people are also hit by the immediate front-line loss of homes, food supplies, culture and future.

It is about time that the World Bank slowed down the funding of deforestation and demanded robust certification of all products connected to its funding programmes. Their action signals to industrial dairy, corporates that market palm products and concerned citizens that all products from the tropical rainforest areas of the world need careful scrutiny. It is not easy to verify that timber or palm products come from socially and ecologically sustainable sources, but consumers can start by asking questions.

This destructive industry is attempting to claim green credibility, but with little success. The English Advertising Standards Authority has just upheld  a complaint by Friends of the Earth of misleading advertising by Malaysian Palm Oil companies. An advertisement claiming palm oil to be The Green Answer was found to be untrue.

The World Bank has signalled change with their cheque-books and we can also do our bit. In this country, and globally, Fonterra needs to examine the use of palm kernel as an animal feed, just like Cadbury did with palm oil recently after intense public pressure.

I’m confident that New Zealanders are also keen to reject illegal logging. Fortunately, Parliament has an opportunity to stand up against rainforest destruction by voting for my Member’s Bill, the Customs and Excise (Sustainable Forestry) Bill, which will regulate the trade at the border. The Bill will be in the House at the end of this month so I’m asking you to remind the Government of Aotearoa New Zealand how to vote for the forests.

77 thoughts on “World Bank Goes Green?

  1. palm oil monoculture plantations are not a ecoloically sustainable alternative to fossil fuels.

    nz can grow biofuels here on farmland, and shldnt be expecting other countries to cut their forests down so biofuels can be grown.

    nz farmers can grow certain types of biofuels alongside crops. Solid Energy the nz mining company is NZs largest biofuel company –

    off that they want to destroy NZ farms to mine lignite – when better things can be done with the land.

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  2. If we are to believe Keys’ soothing placations, the lignite mines will be of no more note than the little hole on the 9th green. And teletubbies will gaily gambol…

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  3. or 10 times the size of the stockton mine from what i have heard –
    would like to see some artists impressions and rough figures re size.

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  4. Artists impression?

    Southland farmland, developed on deep, fertile loams, carefully nurtured by generations of hard-working southern men and women is set to reveal an even greater wealth – black gold they call it – lignite! Rolls off your tongue like tar, silky as asphalt, fragrant as smouldering sulphur. It’s enough to inflate your coal finger to maximum tumescence, eh Gerry!

    http://weblog.greenpeace.org/climate/orcs.png

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  5. ha ha, greenfly hates fat people.
    He might have a “glandular” problem greenfly, you evil ba$tard ;)

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  6. It’s Brownlee’s appetite for our shared resources that appalls me Shunda. His problem is less ‘glandular’ than ‘grandious’. You haven’t yet seen the third image I posted, because it was sucked in by moderation! It may be spat out when Frog sees that it’s quite harmless.

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  7. greenfly says:
    September 14, 2009 at 6:53 pm

    “But you are right Shunda and inside every fat man, there’s one who’s thin.”

    could be a security risk for the Cabinet, especially if the thin man inside Gerry Brownlee isn’t a National supporter.

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  8. Hellooooo everyone, back to realtime. Weird pics and snide digs don’t cut it anymore. Who’s posting about ETS and the role of the Nact and MP?
    Hello??? Anyone home?

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  9. Me. The Nactional Government has destroyed it’s potential to create cross-party agreement on the ETS and the Maori Party have caved again, in a particulary mana-shrinking way.
    I’d add a snide comment or a weird pic, but who’d want more of that malarky in these enlightened times?

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  10. OT – what r we 2 do with airflow technplogies? It is not SUSTAINABLE financialy, shall we nationlise it or subsidise it?

    Just shows, like the Danish windmills, they are only viable with subsidies.

    So we need to know Greenies, do we have efficient oil or higher priced subsidised windmills? i say let the windmills stand up to commercial reality as I pay enough for power as it is.

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  11. Windflow Technology? You can’t even get that part right. What are we to make of the sense of your post?

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/market-data/2861939/Uncertain-future-for-Windflow-Technology

    Sustainable financially? Well no, not in the world according to Goldman-Sacks-The-Planet. There are a lot of companies having trouble these days and I doubt that it has anything to do with their real viability if the economy were not completely twisted.

    Windflow’s customer has a problem, windflow itself was doing fine. However, investment capital is not available for NZ windfarms to complete its deployment and start generating revenue.

    So your principle argument is what? That we should let a large manufacturer of a unique technology and our only local supplier of large wind turbines go under because the investment capital dried up?

    In a market that is subsidized in other countries anyway?

    While we as a nation are dumb enough not to buy our own products?

    So you think we should pump and dig and burn off more dead dinosaurs because you think you are paying “enough” for power.

    Though it is obviously not enough to actually change our habits as a society and is cheap by most other country’s standards.

    In answer to your question, we subsidize the windmills. If you examine the situation as reported, the problem is the start-up costs and investment environment. All we have to do is provide finance for the windfarm corporation until it gets started up. At which time it will be profitable and able to pay us back. Which would happen in a more sane investment environment, but thanks to Government Sachs, Bernanke, Paulson et.al. there isn’t anything like sanity in investing and banking anymore.

    As pointed out, the financial system is twisted, not the company or its technology.

    Should we throw out REAL productive industry in order to satisfy bankers?

    BJ

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  12. Who is that poor wee fella and how do we set him free?, is it Gerry’s conscience?

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  13. Hmm,
    yes, I consider it kind of ironic that the Maori party has little to no mana. lol.

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  14. I have a file of images titled,

    “Buffoons, Gits, Dorks and assorted Ning-Nongs” on my hard-drive.

    Most of them are of Gerry, but Key is there, and most of his cabinet. There are Labour MPs, the entire NZFuture party, Larrys, Rodneys, Rogers and a host of other low-wattage characters, all snuffling about, looking for an good idea to smother.

    Laws is in there, and Wishart.. the sorry list goes on.

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  15. Whilst I track the gnarly knaves, the scurvy Pultroons, noxious varmints and crummy critters.

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  16. Small plasticine models in a tin box.

    Shunda’s has interchangeable heads:
    The Ranter, The Treehugger, The Zealot.

    For Wat, the figure is made of straw.

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  17. Greenfly my brother has just informed me that your summation of my character is largely correct, he also just got told off by my wife for writing swear words on my fridge with the kids magnetic letters.

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  18. I’m liking him!
    Some curses are hard to do on a fridge (not enough ‘e’s) but reasonable facsimiles can be made from slices of ham, which sticks nicely for a day or two.

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  19. In recent years, the World Bank has advanced several initiatives that purport to help developing countries reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to climate change impacts. Yet the World Bank continues to be one of the world’s largest fossil fuel financiers. The World Bank increased fossil fuel lending by 94 percent from 2007 to 2008. Amazingly, funding for coal –- the dirtiest of fossil fuels –- increased by 256 percent.

    The World Bank is positioning itself as one of the major funders of REDD, the latest Kyoto mechanism for privatising old growth forests and putting them up for sale to companies and governments who would like to pretend they’re meeting their climte responsibilities. Of course, this is being done under the guise of protecting these forests – the really sick thing being that this means kicking out lots of indigenous people who were previously managing these forests sustainably.

    The NZ government has been pushing extremely hard to bust this REDD loophole wide open within the Kyoto / COP process. You can see their submission on REDD here…

    http://www.mfe.govt.nz/issues/climate/international/24april-lca-redd.pdf

    The question to ask of your Green MPs is this…
    whats your position on the REDD mechanism and the use of these offsets by countries like New Zealand who want to outsource/offset their climate damage to other countries instead of doing it at home in New Zealand.

    You may just find that your favourite Green MP is quite supportive of REDD.

    more info on REDD is here…
    http://www.reddmonitor.org

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  20. I suspect that as great as this move bythe world bank is, in the bigger scheme of things it does amount to political massaging in the run up to the World Bank’s efforts to relegitimise / Green itself through its installation as the main carbon trading bank for UNFCCC / COP15 / KYOTO etc.

    The world bank is alrady collecing betwen 8/15% comission on ALL carbon credits that are sold through the Clean Development Mechanism.

    pretty scary when you think about how much influence it has over the mechanism itself [what kind of dodgy technology gets approved as an offsetting project etc] and how it spends / redistributes its profits to fossil fuel corporations – which is of course what the World Bank is all about.

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  21. Meaning what for those of us who are not natives ?

    Since my current opinion of the sellout party isn’t really printable in any known language, you may simply respond with some more general allusion to any reserved words involved.

    BJ

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  22. Palm Kernel has nothing to do with droughts, that is just a weak media excuse dreamed up by the spin doctors at Fonterra PKE importer RD1.
    Yes there was a drought in 2007, and yes PKE was fed. However, in 2006 250,000 tonne was imported, in 2008 1.1m tonne, 2009 250,000t in first 4 months. 100,000t in bookied to come over the Timaru port in spring of 2009. No drought here.
    PKE is imported by RD1 which is half owned by the AWB (Australian Wheat Board), by ABB (Australian Barley Board) and Hunter Grains of Australia. The Aussie companies have made an absolute fortune out of PKE, and they will make damn sure nobody interferes with their gravy train.
    This product carries so many biosecurity risks that PKE of this low quality could not be imported into Aussie. This stuff is being imported full of insects, wood and soil. Goodness only knows what some of these insects could do to our flora and fauna, or bird life. We all remember the Painted Apple Moth spraying disaster in Auckland a few years back.
    Our Biosecurity is paramount to NZ future economically and environmentally, why jeopardise that for the profit of Aussie companies, or to provide a bit of cheap feed to the dairy industry????

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  23. I am very skeptical about the world bank. I am interested in what Heretic mentions, My computer is not behaving. Will google REDD moniter again.

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  24. - “So your principle argument is what? That we should let a large manufacturer of a unique technology and our only local supplier of large wind turbines go under because the investment capital dried up? In a market that is subsidized in other countries anyway?”

    Let me see if I’ve got this straight. We can buy these products cheaply, subsidised by poor foreign taxpayers, or we can pay not just full price but actually more than full price because we’d be expected to subsidise it.

    Hmm. Tricky.

    – “While we as a nation are dumb enough not to buy our own products? ”

    Perhaps because we’re not dumb at all but smart enough to understand that we should specialise where we have a competitive advantage and trade with others who do likewise.

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  25. You have to wonder why farmers would import a biosecurity threat to their own source of income? It seems very short-sighted to me.

    Trevor.

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  26. Even though I’m usually sceptical of Govt. intervention in business & ‘job creation’, it seems to me that you’re right about the Wall St. Cabal who’s greed & derelection of their duty to us all, beggars belief – after loaning them billions they continue not to get it. Perhaps a wholesale takeover is required & a complete re-shaping of this ‘industry’ in order. A good start would be the removal of the ‘Fedeal Reserve’s right to issue currency not backed by Gold – don’t spose it matters really as we’re all going to hell in a hand cart thanks to Capitalism, Greed, & Fear of not msking a million a month.

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  27. Banking is one of the most highly regulated business activities – and the regulation has been piled on and on over the last few years.

    In the UK, it was Gordon Brown himself who devised the bank monitoring and regulatory system which failed so disastrously. He also, incidentally, ordered that house prices should be removed from the price index, so their developing bubble didn’t affect the inflation figures and trigger a rise in interest rates to dampen it.

    So we’ve tried lots and lots of regulation and, if anything, it has had the effect of making a major banking disaster more likely rather than less. When the banks understand that their counterparties are tacitly underwritten by the taxpayer there is zero incentive for them to act prudently. When it’s a one-way bet, why be cautious and diligent? Especially when they know that self-interested politicians have everything to gain by bailing out grateful voters whose deposits might be at risk. (the UK bailout of Northern Rock was blatantly political.)

    The idea that the solution is still more regulation is therefore patently absurd.

    What is required is for governments to put the risk squarely back on the banks, and make sure everyone knows it.

    – “we’re all going to hell in a hand cart thanks to Capitalism, Greed, & Fear”

    What has the modern banking system got to do with Capitalism? When profits are private but the risks are public then you most certainly are not talking about a Capitalist system. As I said before, big companies just love those regulations.

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  28. Several Reasons –
    It is very cheap, due to the fact it is a waste product and few other countries allow it to be imported.
    The Importers aggressively market it, including the Farm Consultants from Dairy NZ – which is a part of Fonterra by coincedence!
    RD1 are selling PKE interest free.
    Dairy Farmers are oblivous to the risks.
    And they couldn’t give a damn.

    If the Greens want to win the PKE argument all you need to do is tell Fonterra’s overseas custommers what NZ cows REALLY eat for breakfast!

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  29. um, if it’s a ‘waste’ product as the fed farmers purport why are they paying for it. surely disposing of waste as they are they should be being paid to take it.

    the argument that it is a waste product and therefore not contributing to demand is a fallacy. anything making a practice more profitable is helping create demand for that process.

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  30. every picture has the proverbial, thousand words, Phil…
    this is not necessarily fortunate.

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  31. Conclusion – Brown and others were duped as we all were – FSA were not allowed by politicians, who are in the hands of Financiers, to properly regulate.

    The checks & balances were removed by those who knew better but believed the economists lies that risk had been removed by the invention of Financial Instruments that no one really understood, particularly the Regulators & certainly not the Nobel Prize Committee.

    The belief that there is such a thing as a rational consumer who acts for the betterment of all out of their own enlightened self interest is frankly Crap, as is much of modern economic thinking.

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  32. All my UK friends get the real story on the NZ dairy industry & it’s polluting ways – they usually don’t seem to care except the hard core greens & they wouldn’t come anyway because of CO2 & Air-Miles. Neither do they eat Kiwi products if it’s at all possible to avoid them. I don’t find either that many believe that ‘Anchor’ is a brand of English butter as reported by the Media. (apparently a majority in a small poll of a few hundred shoppers thought so). Such brands as Mainland etc., are unknown in the UK.

    How can the Tourist promoters get away with the continuing lie of NZ as a clean green country when it is patently not. More Market freedoms ?

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  33. New Zealand farmers are aware of the fact that palm kernel comes with some serious issues. Is’nt it ironic that our farming industry has become part of this. Perhaps pk reduces the emissions from animals…..now there’s a thought.

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  34. Nope Wat, Letting Windflow fail because its customer, Windfarms NZ could not find the Investment capital to finish building and get its revenue streams on line… all due to the banksters manipulations and some other government’s support of them, our tax distortions in favor of investing in anything as long as its real-estate, and the great money such of the Australian banks… THAT would be stupid.

    The principle of comparative advantage is wrongly applied when it is applied to everything as well.

    http://tinyurl.com/lh7kkc

    For us there are some major problems with our import dependencies, and the religious application of “comparative advantage” to the immense detriment of our industry and manufacturing base has cost us dearly.

    We are the ones who have the wind resource and should and eventually WILL have a large demand for wind turbines. Not that our demand for the things is small now, but at this point we want turbines even bigger than the Windflow product. Which is true because Windflow is a start up company.

    Note that their finances are NOT in question, except as their customer is in trouble. Their business model was sound enough and they’ve now learned enough to design a bigger turbine. Which would allow them to compete with Vespa.

    We’ll cover banks separately if you please. The topics are not particularly well joined.

    BJ

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  35. Sure is a waste product, the retail price in NZ is simply the cost of shipping handling and of course the massive profits for the Aussie Multinationals…
    The problem with the biosecurity is also due to PKE being a waste product, in Asia nobody could give a damn how it is handled or stored. The rest of the world’s PKE is mainly used in Europe as a fuel in thermal power stations… We feed it to our cows and then sell the Europeans milk products…hmmm…

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  36. Sorry jimmy no luck on that. PKE is very high in protein and when fed with pasture, especially in the spring which is also high in protein, the cow cannot absorb it all, so the cow excretes high quantities of methane and nitrate. On a pasture diet the cow needs to be supplemented with carbohydrates. The agricultural science community have studied this.

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  37. The kernel should go back onto the ground from which it was grown. We are ‘stealing’ their soil, turning it into sh*t and sluicing it into our rivers for our kids to splash around in. The biosecurity risk from insects and pathogens carried on the kernel pales into insignificance when compared to the damage the larger black and white organisms have already done to our environment.

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  38. Galeandra – where’s your informative follow-up and discussion of the ETS developments?

    Keen reader

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  39. bigblukiwi,

    depands upon your interpretation of “clean” and “green”. Your interpretation is environmental.

    For other it is graphical.

    For example, drive around Australia and the predominant colour is brown and ochre.

    Come to new Zealand and the predominant colour is green. Ask any Australian visitor and the first thing they remark upon is how “green” it is over here.

    Compared with other countries I have visited, New Zeaalnd is as “clean” as the next. No more or less rubbish or litter then the next.

    So the slogan is all in the eye of the beholder.

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  40. Gerrit -New Zealand is as ‘clean’ as the next (country)? Is that a supposed to be encouraging?
    The various mayors of Southland are expressing their increasing concern at the ‘dumping’ of human faeces at rest areas, picnic sites, along roadsides; anywhere, it seems, that tourists might like to relieve themselves of their burden. While this might be common practice in other countries, I think it is an example that negates your,

    ‘ ..is all in the eye of the beholder’ claim somewhat.

    More like, ‘on the sole of the shoe of the beholder’.

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  41. Gerrit says:
    September 16, 2009 at 7:42 am

    > Compared with other countries I have visited, New Zeaalnd is as “clean” as the next. No more or less rubbish or litter then the next.

    I wasn’t aware that the phrase ‘clean and green’ was suppiosed to mean ‘no more or less clean than the next country’

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  42. Aside from your error relating to the regulation of the banks I tend to agree with much of what you say.

    The fiasco of the past decade would have been impossible while the banks in the USA were by LAW separated into investment and commercial banks in the

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass-Steagall_Act

    Glass-Steagall act.

    The repeal of Glass-Steagall may not be the SOLE cause of what happened, there are other issues relating to the way the economy is mismanaged, some of which you touch on, but there is no doubt in my mind that the repeal of this act was one of the largest errors made by the Congress in 1999.

    (an amendment sponsored by Goldman-Sachs)

    —————————-

    That regulation kept the scale of the prior debacles somewhere close to being manageable.

    Note: Gordon Brown dumped Gold in what is now regarded as the “Brown Bottom”. His financial expertise has to come in a poor second to that of the average chimpanzee.

    However, you ARE correct in this: The system as it exists is pathetically broken and properly needs to be shoved into a deep pit and buried forever.

    You and I will undoubtedly disagree on how it needs to be replaced, but your dissertation on “moral hazard” and the effects of the government backing the banks, the effects of those “one-way-bets” is short and to the point. There is NO way that the government should be helping out AIG or Goldman the way they are.

    As to what to do?

    You’ve probably noticed some of my posts relating to the currency itself. I prefer a redeemable, non-fractional-reserve system of currency, backed by work energy. This corresponds to no known economic school of thought, though it has some commonality with the Austrians in that it regards fractional-reserve as fundamentally flawed. Not for exactly the same reasons, but fundamentally and fatally nonetheless.

    I think of money as representing work in most all respects. Which makes it impossible for me to accept it being created out of thin air.

    So so so… given my requirement for redeemability in terms of work, the most convenient form is the KWH, which is purely work. This implies central control of the currency by the government itself, not by the private central bank, and government control of major electrical generation capacity.

    Banks then, become aggregators of our debt and deposit transactions, but with the storage of work being subject to losses, the bank will have to charge interest for establishing a checking account, and can pay you interest only if you establish a lending account, essentially a CD, which then must limit your access to those funds while the money (work) is being used by someone else, who will pay it back with interest.

    The creation of money then doesn’t happen at the banker’s behest, it only happens when the government decides to print the stuff. The control of the economy passes from the speculators to the citizens.

    Which follows the principles that Jefferson envisioned and Jackson, Lincoln, Kennedy, Garfield and McKinley supported.

    (Tinfoil hats)
    Jefferson: “I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around [the banks] will deprive the people of all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered. The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs.” (The bank was established over his objections)

    Jackson: “You are a den of vipers. I intend to rout you out, and by the Eternal God I will rout you out. If the people only understood the rank injustice of our money and banking system, there would be a revolution before morning.” (attempted assassination)

    Garfield : – openly declared that whoever controls the supply of currency would control the business and activities of all the people. After only four months in office. (Assassinated – shot at a railroad station on July 2, 1881)

    Lincoln :
    “The money power preys upon the nation in time of peace and conspires against it in times of adversity. It is more despotic than monarchy, more insolent than autocracy, more selfish than bureaucracy. I see in the near future a crisis approaching that unnerves me, and causes me to tremble for the safety of our country. Corporations have been enthroned, an era of corruption will follow, and the money power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people, until the wealth is aggregated in a few hands, and the republic is destroyed.” (Assassinated – there are peculiarities in Booth’s diaries )

    McKinley: A “Hard Money” zealot.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_Standard_Act
    (keeping United States notes redeemed in gold at the Treasury, to be paid out again only in exchange for gold.)
    (Assassinated)

    Kennedy: “President John F. Kennedy signed Executive Order No. 11110 that returned to the U.S. government the power to issue currency, without going through the Federal Reserve. Mr. Kennedy’s order gave the Treasury the power “to issue silver certificates against any silver bullion, silver, or standard silver dollars in the Treasury.” (Assassinated)

    I read this little compendium into the record for people to think about.

    Considering the current state of affairs as Goldman-Sachs is in the process of taking over the rest of the world’s banking.

    http://tinyurl.com/lde3qu

    It bears some thought. I can’t quite get the feeling that it is not entirely coincidental. There is a vast amount of “coincidental” that all just happened to permit the establishment of the primacy of the banks. I just don’t tend to believe in coincidences when money and power like this is involved.

    (/Tinfoil Hats)

    I note that my approach and yours agree, the banks have to be taking on the risks. Mine takes the currency AWAY from the banks, which may or may not be in accordance with your views.

    However, given that I don’t have much expectation that either of us will succeed in wresting control of this country, much less the rest of the planet, from the banker’s, I will continue to regard brutally regulating them as the next best option.

    respectfully
    BJ

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  43. There is nothing inherently evil about an international financial organization. As much as we might protest it, it is a global world today, and a body that oversees the smooth flow and interchange of currencies and other financial instruments is needed in today’s world.

    But the organization cannot be controlled by international bankers who are not answerable to the citizens of the countries in which they operate. It should be overseen by a senior level group which itself is organized as a liberal republic, following the original model of the United States.

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  44. Well, gerrit is correct in that both clean and green are comparitive rather than absolute. Were they absolute no country could ever claim eaither and we would fall into the trap that phil is on the edge of where anyone not full following something to the last punctuation point cannot be classified as a member.
    Since both clean and green are comparitive both in general use and due to practical consideration it is our cleanliness and greeness comparitive to other countries of a similar nature that detirmines if the title/advertising may be considered legitimate or not.

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  45. Sapient – if we claimed to be clean and green 5 years ago and have seen a deterioration of, say, our waterways since then, are we still clean and green.
    Futher to that, are our rivers clean, do you think?

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  46. The worrying thing for me r&b, is that this product is now being fed to sheep, weaned dairy bull calves and probably any other class of animal that has to be fed in times of feed shortages.
    Farmers will very quickly work out how to incorporate this product into their business, if they choose to, and some will increase stocking rates (above sustainable levels) as a result.
    We will no doubt be suprised, or not, to see the various attitudes of interested parties as this plays out – our Prime Minister can’t see that there is a problem so I guess that sets the tone.

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  47. Hey jimmy,
    PKE has nothing to do with drought, regardless of what the Feds chairman or RD1 CEO had to say on tonight’s news. PKE has become the lazy option for dairy farmers.
    In times gone by, a farmer would set stocking rates at an appropriate level to allow for seasonal variation, he(she) would then plan ahead and harvest surplus feed as hay or silage, or in areas prone to summer dry they would plant a summer crop or grow maize. If they encountered an autumn dry spell, they would go onto once a day milking. NZ dairying survived for 130 years like this.
    Nowdays stocking rates are higher and when the feed runs out they simply ring RD1 or Swaps and 30tonnes of PKE turns up, problem solved, no planning required.
    What is now being seen on farms is that intensive PKE feeding is causing a reduction in cow life and other metabolic problems.
    The Agresearch Report that Sue Kedgley presented in Parliament apprently shows that PKE can hold Aflatoxins that cause milk to be Toxic, Far out Fonterra, get your act together.
    As for the PM, he is being extremely badly advised by MAF, PKE posed an extreme risk to our nation’s biosecurity. Insects in this stuff could ruin our forestry industry, native floras and fruit industry. Soil has been found in PKE, and if that carried foot and mouth, then NZ will become a 3rd world country.
    As for Fonterra’s brand, this is Sanlu all over again.
    Why run the risk? For what? To make heaps of money for some Aussie Companies – Seems pretty dumb to me.

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  48. Hey Greenfly,
    I do not want to get into a debate about farming with you, however I find your generalisations about farming to be personnally offensive and inaccurate.
    I am a fourth generation farmer with a young family. I am determined that this property will be in better condition at the end of my farming career than the start.
    We are not dairy farmers, but the produce from this farm helps feed the world. To do that I grow plants, and in order for those plants to produce well, I must care for our environment.
    Yes some dairy farmers are rogues, and they should be encouraged to change their ways. But I think broad generalisations do great harm and severely undermine the efforts of the Green Loby. We are not environmental rapists.
    In our district, our local river is clean and swimmable until immedaitely below the urban area.
    I would suggest that it would add huge credibilty to the green loby if you got along side farmers and worked to achieve common goals.
    If we are to feed a growing world population for generations to come, then we must care for our productive soils and environment.
    Cheers.

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  49. Yes I have to agree with you redandblack – we aren’t doing ourselves any favours.
    There seems to be real desperation out there at the moment with some farmers really struggling to feed stock especially here on the east coast of the north island. Having lived rurally, I have seen the use of palm kernel skyrocket and we were not in a dairying area. The cost of this product will/has made it an option for a lot of farmers. It may be hard to persuade people to stop using it which is why Greenpeace are taking action I guess.
    Someone needs to take the lead here and really get the facts out there – or are you saying these are known by all and being ignored. As you say, there is a lot on the line.

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  50. Hey jimmy,
    Don’t you worry Fed Farmers and MAF hold all the documentation, but are choosing to ignore it, very very irresponsible.

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  51. Redandblack. Surely those days should be long gone. In the interests of the industry in the longer term Fed Farmers need to show some leadership if there are serious issues with this product.
    On a lighter note, greenfly is ok – just passionate about this earth. You are quite right to point out the fact that most farmers care for the land as much if not more that the next person. I certainly found this to be the case although I was managing a couple of organic sheep and beef units in a conventionally farmed area and sometimes felt a little like you when you visit this site….the lion’s den.

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  52. Hey redandblack

    Hey Greenfly,
    I do not want to get into a debate about farming with you,

    That’s a pity. Your and my views seem to be very similar. Your response to jimmy below mirrors my thoughts closely

    however I find your generalisations about farming to be personnally offensive and inaccurate.

    I apologise then, for any offense

    I am a fourth generation farmer with a young family. I am determined that this property will be in better condition at the end of my farming career than the start.
    We are not dairy farmers, but the produce from this farm helps feed the world. To do that I grow plants, and in order for those plants to produce well, I must care for our environment.
    Yes some dairy farmers are rogues, and they should be encouraged to change their ways.

    Yes they are. Why should ‘rogues’ be encouraged? Good farmers should be encouraged to be better farmers, but ‘rogues’ encouraged? Hmm… We don’t agree there. Perhaps ‘rigorously encouraged, like Mr Crafar?

    But I think broad generalisations do great harm and severely undermine the efforts of the Green Loby.

    This is a free-speaking Green blog, redandblack. Do you want me to be talk nicely here?

    We are not environmental rapists.

    I accept that you are not carelessly damaging your environment. I am quite familiar with many who are, hence my point of view. I’ve worked on a number of farms, up and down the country and have had a close look from the inside.

    In our district, our local river is clean and swimmable until immedaitely below the urban area.

    I am as appalled by the management of urban land as I am of rural. I’m active in both criticising and repairing that in my home town.

    I would suggest that it would add huge credibilty to the green loby if you got along side farmers and worked to achieve common goals.

    I operate a nursey for riparian planting projects in our area, if that’s any help. I chair a Landcare group and work on other projects to protect heritage aspects of our oldest farms. I get to see a lot of farms that way and meet with farming families often. I speak to groups of farmers and their wives (seperately, usually :-)
    If we are to feed a growing world population for generations to come, then we must care for our productive soils and environment.

    Agreed. Good on you.
    Cheers.

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  53. - “Letting Windflow fail because its customer, Windfarms NZ could not find the Investment capital to finish building and get its revenue streams on line… all due to the banksters manipulations and some other government’s support of them, our tax distortions in favor of investing in anything as long as its real-estate, and the great money such of the Australian banks… THAT would be stupid.”

    There are countless other businesses in more or less the same situation. Are we taxpayers to be forced to subsidise all of them? Or is it just those industries with political influence who get subsidised, like some sort of third-world banana republic, or the United States?

    You are here arguing for Windflow. Probably there are thousands of other people who could make an equally good case for their pet schemes. I suggest you sort it out amongst yourselves first and then, when you’ve all agreed which company or companies are to receive this gift of workers’ money, you come back and tell us.

    – “For us there are some major problems with our import dependencies, and the religious application of “comparative advantage” to the immense detriment of our industry and manufacturing base has cost us dearly.”

    On what basis do you claim that specialisation coupled with free trade has “cost us dearly?” Muldoon was the epitome of what you are demanding, and he reduced NZ to an economic basket case. So, no thank you.

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  54. No one doubts that NZ is a green coloured country as Australia is predominantly brown. What the publicity infers is that it is green in the sense that it has superior environmental credentials.

    This is not true in the sense that it suffers from extreme pollution of it’s streams, shows obvious signs of soil erosion, overgrazing, has many ‘industrial’ farms, & recently outed bad practice in pig-farming.

    Agreed it does not have an excess of litter or obvious street rubbish like many other nations e.g. Britian, & the US. but that does not make it ‘green’. It’s record on re-cycling for example is not exemplary.

    Perhaps after Copenhagen it may yet have worse environmental credentials.

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  55. Thats good I suppose but why dont our politions (including the Greens )and News media tell kiwi’s about the privately owned World Bank.

    1. You have probably heard about Private Public Partnerships the National Parties “Bill English” goes on about. Sounds sneeky doesn’t it.

    Take a look at this World Bank webpage on PPP’s

    http://info.worldbank.org/etools/PPPI-Portal/

    Well its the policy of the World Bank. A bunch of Private Bankers who want everything available for sale. The World Bank and the IMF are just down the road from the whitehouse and the US Treasury. In my view their privatisation dreams and policies are so that some time in the the future these private bankers can buy everything after they have crashed everything to an affordable price. A step towards Global Consolidation into a few hands. Just like the Global Media and the current Banking consolidation going on. And yes the BP spill is more than likely an attempt to reorder the world oil supply.

    http://www.youtube.com/15jonathan#p/c/6F33853EDC4B5C8F

    A playlist of video’s about the World Bank.
    Fomer Chief economist of the world bank Joseph Stiglitz talks to the BBC about what the World Bank get up to and their prescription for privatisation. Their deeds according to Stiglitz include rigging the Russian elections with the colusion of the Clinton white house to keep Yeltzin in power. And Stiglitz was Clintons Chief economist and in his cabinet at the time so was privy to all. This is not a conspiracy theory its a Nobel prize winning whistle blower speaking out. But our NZ New’s will not touch this story like many others so please let people know who the Nats really represent when they talk about privatisation. Would the Nats rig our elections with their help? Well we had better watch out. The Nats have already consolidated all the electoral offices illegedly to save money but I don’t trust them one little bit and think they may have another motive. Lets face it they will never be able to implement their most draconian dreams with free elections. And they do have dreams of selling our stuff.

    A quote from Ronn Paul video( US congresman of 40 years )

    “The world bank promotes managed trade by which politically connected individuals and corporations enrich themselves at the expense of the poor and the middle class.”

    In a David Ike video ( in the playlist linked to above )about the banking system he says.

    “The third world debt is debt on money that has never, does not, and will never exist. Last time I saw the figures about 400,000 children in Brazil died from hunger related disease every year. At the time I saw those figures Brazil was the second biggest exporter of food in the world and the money recieved from that export (great chunks of it) was servicing interest on money that has never existed and as one Brazillian official I was reading about recently said “most ot the money that constitutes the Brazillian debt never left the computer systems of wall street.” My god its time for a turning of the tide.”

    So why do we want a government that enacts the policies of the World Bank. Clearly against the interests of Kiwis. This is who the sickening smile of Mr Key represents. A load of well conected bankers who willfully sacrifice the lives of Brazillion children for their unlimited profits. Why wont anyone tell New Zealanders just who’s bidding National is doing when English talks about Mum and Pop investors. He really means the bankers want it, maybe not next week but they want to see progress towards ownership of everything and complete control over who lives and dies, just like all those poor dead Brazillion children and countless other poor of the world.

    So Chickens. Get your tongues waging. Lets reveal to Kiwis just who Key and his flunkies are looking after. Its not you honey.

    Be the media. Copy / Paste / Email and don’t be put off if you don’t win everyone over immdeiately. Just keep going and get the job our corporate media will not do, done.

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  56. Well its the policy of the World Bank. A bunch of Private Bankers who want everything available for sale. The World Bank and the IMF are just down the road from the whitehouse and the US Treasury. In my view their privatisation dreams and policies are so that some time in the the future these private bankers can buy everything after they have crashed everything to an affordable price.

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  57. The world bank. The outfit that told India no capital unless “you lose your socialist chains”. Starved millions of people in third world countries to get land for mining companies and agribusiness in the West.
    Told countries that could not afford to, to “open their economies”.
    Responsible for more death and devastation than all the wars since 1955.. Making the world safe for big business.

    That world bank.

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