Kevin Hague questions the Minister of Agriculture

Green Party MP Kevin Hague asks the Minister of Agriculture: Has the Dairying and Clean Streams Accord achieved its aim of “clean, healthy water including streams, rivers, lakes, groundwater, and wetlands in dairying areas”; or, does he agree with National MP Nick Smith’s statement of October 2008 that there has been a “deterioration in water quality”?

The short answer? NO! We have got to do an awful lot better if we want our waterways to be swimmable, let alone drinkable. Russel’s release and commentary here.


Not bad for his first question in parliament, eh? I particularly liked the judicious use of ‘defecate’. ;-)

21 thoughts on “Kevin Hague questions the Minister of Agriculture

  1. Hey, it’s my Canadian ancestry, eh? Just cause I never met any of them doesn’t mean I don’t carry the gene, eh? ;-)

    I do promise, however to leave the … alone …, eh…?

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  2. gee..!..just as the mainstream media seem to be taking it ..

    .. up wholesale ..

    ‘canadian’..eh..?

    ..the swiss of the nth american continent..

    ..phil(whoar.co.nz)

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  3. In the absence of a general debate thread can I use this thread to say that I am right behind Sue K in her bid to ban the importation of cat and dog skins.

    Keep up the good work Sue.

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  4. “her bid to ban the importation of cat and dog skins.”

    …from sourced from live animals no less. The mind boggles.

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  5. In other news….anyone see 60 minutes? The oil price was driven by speculation, not supply and demand.

    And let’s recall this thread from May last year:

    http://blog.greens.org.nz/2008/05/26/robert-hirsch-forecasts-us12-15-per-gallon/

    On the greeny side….

    “It’s not a speculative bubble. It’s supply and demand. If you want a conspiracy theory, build one around artificial manipulation of supply: that would still be kooky but at least the numbers would add up.”

    “Funny that the oil futures market has moved from permanent backwardation to contango.”

    “BP – we have a supply issue, and all the oil companies, the IEA and the EIA agree that this is the case. The IEA will formally publish their significant supply downgrade in November. Stay tuned…”

    “You can’t run a huge long-term speculative bubble on oil”

    On the right side, in all respects:

    “Yes you can, and they are. The futures market is leveraged to the hilt, fueled by Peak Oil mythology and US government policy.

    Watch for the shorts. Comin’ to a computer screen near you soonish….”

    BluePeter nails it yet again….

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  6. PS: Frog appeared to have missed this one…from November….

    http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/iea-doesnt-see-peak-oil/story.aspx?guid={C844CC20-F5BC-4627-987A-7CBF7FE50923}

    “The International Energy Agency on Wednesday dismissed fears about peak oil, but the group said under-investment could lead to production troubles. The IEA published the full report on its world energy outlook after releasing a summary last week.
    “Although global oil production is not expected to peak before 2030, conventional crude-oil production is projected to level off toward the end of the projection period,” it said. “

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  7. You’re from CehNehDeh! So are my children – born and bred! Let’s ban PhilYou from using our heritage foir his own purposes, we CehNehDIehNS have a traditional use claim of eh, and should enforce it, eh!

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  8. Troll said:

    In other news….anyone see 60 minutes? The oil price was driven by speculation, not supply and demand.

    Sigh! Forever the Greens have to be giving economics lessons to trolls.

    The bubble was driven by speculation. The price of oil over shot the mark (its equilibrium price) by quite a bit.

    Then there was a financial crash that has precipitated an economic crash and the bubble has burst.

    What is the price of oil now, in a slump, compared to what it was 5 years ago, in a boom?

    If there were no constraints on supply, and no monopoly rents being made we would expect the price now to be cheaper than it was 5 years ago.

    Is it?

    peace
    W

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  9. That is “Sir Troll”, to you.

    Greenie types weren’t even acknowledging speculation. And if they did, they were saying it was marginal. They so much wanted to believe the price was a result of supply and demand, brought about by Peak Oil.

    And they were WRONG.

    No change there, really.

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  10. well really speculation is an example of supply and demand as entities seek to buy up a product in the hopes that they can make a profit through onselling it at a future point in time, but meh.

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  11. “And they were WRONG.”

    We’ll all we’ve got so far is BP claiming that a segment of 60 minutes is a slam dunk proof that speculation was the sole cause of the high oil prices, that the fundamentals played no part. Sorry I haven’t even seen it and I’m not willing to conceed anything on his word alone. What is new in this that we haven’t heard before?

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  12. “A recent report out of MIT, analyzing world oil production and consumption, also concluded that the basic fundamentals of supply and demand could not have been responsible for last year’s run-up in oil prices. And Michael Masters says the U.S. Department of Energy’s own statistics show that if the markets had been working properly, the price of oil should have been going down, not up.

    “From quarter four of ’07 until the second quarter of ’08 the EIA, the Energy Information Administration, said that supply went up, worldwide supply went up. And worldwide demand went down. So you have supply going up and demand going down, which generally means the price is going down,” Masters told Kroft.

    “And this was the period of the spike,” Kroft noted.”

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  13. “”From July 15th until the end of November, roughly $70 billion came out of commodities futures from these index funds,” Masters explained. “In fact, gasoline demand went down by roughly five percent over that same period of time. Yet the price of crude oil dropped more than $100 a barrel. It dropped 75 percent.”

    Asked how he explains that, Masters said, “By looking at investors, that’s the only way you can explain it.”

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  14. Sir Troll

    I am not going to trawl through all our press releases to find the evidence. But we have been saying that the long term trend of oil prices is up.

    And we are RIGHT.

    peace
    W

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  15. yes, sorry, a bubble results from the actions of speculators influencing relative supply and demand as they buy up goods in an attempt to make a profit through onselling them back into the market from which they purchased them. :P
    It may be that the price was caused by a shortage of supply or it may be that it was caused by speculators, most likely by speculators and resulting demand being unable to be met by present production, but eather way it is still all suppoly and demand.

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