The missing name from the SPCA’s list of shame

Despite this gruesome reading from the SPCA:

A number of the animals had been hurt by slug gun pellets and other projectiles, and there were signs that children were being allowed to use animals for target practice.

Cases of neglect included an Auckland dog discovered on Christmas Eve after surviving without food or water for at least five weeks, and an elderly dog, its testicles ruptured by cancer, abandoned in a picnic area near Whakatane.

Sue Kedgley noted that yesterday’s yearly list of shame from the SPCA was missing some of the most brutal animal cruelty offenses of all:

The SPCA focussed on individual acts of cruelty to animals, but in reality hundreds of thousands of animals are treated cruelly – on an industrial scale – on a day to day basis in New Zealand. Hens and sows in New Zealand are locked in cages or sow crates where they can’t even turn around and suffer all kinds of mental and physical injuries.

The failure of successive Governments to act to protect animals in New Zealand from cruel treatment should be added to the SPCA’s list of shame,

Our industrial food system is not just an attack on our climate and our future health but it is anincreasing attack on our morality. It needs to be hidden behind the closed doors of battery farms for us to be able to comfortably ignore the abuse we would otehrwise have to confront.

20 thoughts on “The missing name from the SPCA’s list of shame

  1. Like chaining oneself to logging trucks and destroying the grass?

    You’re right. It’s really childish.

  2. Alright, criticise this keeping of animals, but how are we going to keep meat affordable to the poor? When my folks migrated here in the 1980s, they were shocked at how expensive chicken was compared with overseas.

  3. Seems there might be a few more missing names from the Hall of Shame: – like David Farrar, Emmy Gargiulo, and Michael Mabbet – all National Party activists!

    Please click on the link above – although you will be shocked by the depths of depravity some people can sink to.

    And BB, is this enough to persuade you to vote Green, despite your not agreeing with our economic policies?

  4. Why should flesh or battery eggs be made affordable to the poor, or anyone else. There is no excuse for poverty in a land of plenty like New Zealand, so why should we use one form of exploitation to justify even worse exploitation of animals. Crying crocodile tears for the poor is a very cruel and cynical ploy by the flesh industry to try and justify its revolting practices.

    Besides, meat is actually an expensive form of protein. Anyone who takes the trouble to look at the scientifically respectable table of food values, published by Crop and Food and the Ministry of Health, and then compare prices, will quickly see that rolled oats, beans, peas, lentils and peanuts are all far cheaper sources of protein than meat, cheese or eggs.

  5. “Besides, meat is actually an expensive form of protein. Anyone who takes the trouble to look at the scientifically respectable table of food values, published by Crop and Food and the Ministry of Health, and then compare prices, will quickly see that rolled oats, beans, peas, lentils and peanuts are all far cheaper sources of protein than meat, cheese or eggs.”

    Yes, and you would need a metric tonne of rolled oats, beans, peas, lentils or peanuts to get the same amount of protein than by eating meat, cheese or eggs. Why do you think vegetarians need to watch what they eat so carefully? You don’t get enough protein from non-meat foods, unless you eat bucketloads of them.

    “There is no excuse for poverty in a land of plenty like New Zealand, so why should we use one form of exploitation to justify even worse exploitation of animals.”

    Of course there is no excuse for poverty, however, while poverty exists, we can at least ensure that poor people have the ability to include a decent amount of protein in their diet (and not the piddly amounts that you are proposing).

    “Crying crocodile tears for the poor is a very cruel and cynical ploy by the flesh industry to try and justify its revolting practices.”

    Maybe the flesh industry, but I am not crying crocodile tears – I am genuinely concerned about the ability of poor people to get affordable food. Unfortunately, the Greens seem to be all in favour of measures that would see the price of food increase instead of decrease (I am thinking of things such as the self sustainability push, the proposed heavy emphasis on pure organics, &c, not GE which I do believe we need to proceed extremely cautiously on).

    “Why should flesh or battery eggs be made affordable to the poor, or anyone else.”

    Because that would free up funds for poor people to utilise on things such as buying shoes for their children, or purchasing the next tinny (alright, I admit that was a snide remark). It is all about opportunity costs, by spending an extra dollar on food means that an extra dollar cannot be spent on clothing, housing or other necessities – of course, most chardonnay socialists do not realise the importance of making each dollar count.

  6. “And BB, is this enough to persuade you to vote Green, despite your not agreeing with our economic policies?”

    Toad, I cannot speak for big bro, but the first thing that would help persuade me to vote Green is to get rid of the policy that would see pot legalised. After that, there are about a million other things that would need to change to persuade me to vote Green.

  7. Actually it will not require a metric tonne f any non-animal food to get enough protein. I suggest you do some research before making such sweeping and ignorant statements. And meat production is a cause of poverty, not its solution. The destruction of habitats for flesh and the displacement of subsistence farmers for the flesh industry is one of the major reasons why millions of children world wide go to bed hungry.

    If we are talking about economy, as a vegan I can feed myself for $30-$40 per week. I know struggling flesh eaters who have to spend about $70 per week to get the same amount of nutritionally adequate food. Instead of creating an even more miserable underclass in a misguided attempt to help the poor, it may be better to include more education on cooking and nutrition so that everyone can learn how to cook decent affordable meals for $30 per week.

  8. kiore1,

    I think you have your blinkers on.

    The destruction of habitats for flesh and the displacement of subsistence farmers for the flesh industry is one of the major reasons why millions of children world wide go to bed hungry.

    I think you are forgetting THE major reason and that is despot tyrants like Mugabe where the land is not farmed for either grain or cattle.

    Nor those racist maniacs in Rwanda, the Congo, etc. where ethnic cleansing of one tribe by another is the cause of NIL farming activity.

    Sometimes one seens only what one wants to see.

  9. john-ston – faced by “about a million other things that would need to change to persuade me to vote Green” I suggest you save yourself the trouble of commenting on the Frogblog and go somewhere less challenging for you. We’d be relieved of the bother of responding to your unnecessary comments as well :-)

  10. turnip28 – tell me more. How is my reponse typical? You’re a self confessed non-green and user of snide remarks :-) Why do you come here? Are you hoping to change the way greenies think? Are you expecting to learn something from the greenies who write here? I think you are weighed down by preconceptions of ‘what greens think’.

  11. “If we are talking about economy, as a vegan I can feed myself for $30-$40 per week. I know struggling flesh eaters who have to spend about $70 per week to get the same amount of nutritionally adequate food. Instead of creating an even more miserable underclass in a misguided attempt to help the poor, it may be better to include more education on cooking and nutrition so that everyone can learn how to cook decent affordable meals for $30 per week.”

    As an omnivore, if I had to, I could easily feed myself for $30 – $40 per week. The struggling flesh eaters would probably be wanting to have rump steaks every night.

    “Actually it will not require a metric tonne f any non-animal food to get enough protein. I suggest you do some research before making such sweeping and ignorant statements.”

    It is common knowledge that one of the biggest problems that a vegetarian faces is getting enough protein in a non-meat diet, because meat is so protein dense compared with non-meat foods.

    “I suggest you save yourself the trouble of commenting on the Frogblog and go somewhere less challenging for you.”

    I enjoy the challenge; it makes me aware of how people on other parts of the political spectrum think, and enables me to formulate argument against them and have the argument challenged.

  12. It is common knowledge that one of the biggest problems that a vegetarian faces is getting enough protein in a non-meat diet, because meat is so protein dense compared with non-meat foods.

    It is not common knowledge; I don’t know it, and nor does the American Dietetics Association. Nor apparently does the ministry of health, because they keep insisting on publishing food tables that show a high level of protein in foods such as beans, rolled oats and peanuts. Nor do most vegetarians or vegans, who live healthy lifestyles with more than enough protein from eating 3 meals a day just like everyone else. Nor do the many millions of peasants in places as diverse as Mexico, Indonesia and China who have developed a cuisine around protein rich plant foods such as peanuts (Indonesia), corn and beans (Mexico) and soy (China and Japan).

    You should also remember that most people eat too much protein. The Recommended Daily Intake, according to groups like the American Dietetics Association or the World Health Organisation is far lower that the amount eaten by flesh sated New Zealanders. The excess is either shat out, converted to fat, or broken down into harmful products that have been linked to cancer and kidney stones among other things.

    The poor are actually suffering from obesity adult onset diabetes and other diseases as a result of too much cheap meat. If the poor cut their meat ration in half, then they would be far healthier. Again, cheap meat is a cause of a problem relating to poverty, not a solution.

  13. “I suggest you save yourself the trouble of commenting on the Frogblog and go somewhere less challenging for you.”

    BTW that comment was not mine even though you lumped it with my other comments. I actually like reading a range of opinions on frog blog. I even enjoy most of BB’s comments. I am disappointed he has not commented on this post. I know we pretty much agree as far as animal cruelty is concerned, though I am sure he would have a different take on poverty.

  14. Gerrit Says:
    November 1st, 2008 at 7:21 am

    > I think you are forgetting THE major reason and that is despot tyrants like Mugabe where the land is not farmed for either grain or cattle.

    true in Zimbabwe, and there was some truth to it in the case of the 1984 Ethiopian famine, too.

    > Nor those racist maniacs in Rwanda, the Congo, etc. where ethnic cleansing of one tribe by another is the cause of NIL farming activity.

    actually, most of the killing in Rwanda was motivated by a shortage of farmland. Racism generally hepled them decide which people to kill for the purpose of nicking their farmland, but the cause was overpopulation and the fact that that idea of how to deal with it was ingrained in their traditions.

  15. “actually, most of the killing in Rwanda was motivated by a shortage of farmland.”

    And eating meat requires lots of farmland. Socrates warned us that meat eating would lead to war 2500 years ago. Some people never learn.

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