Stephanie Alexander talks food in schools

Sue Kedgley has been putting her journalism skills to work and talking to Australian chef Stephanie Alexander about the Kitchen Gardens in Schools she initiated.

Kitchen Gardens in Schools is described as such:

In the Kitchen Garden Program children across Years 3 to 6 spend a minimum of 40 minutes a week in an extensive vegetable garden which they have helped design, build and maintain on the school grounds according to organic gardening principles. They also spend one and a half hours each week in a kitchen classroom preparing and sharing a wonderful variety of meals created from their produce. The project employs two part-time specialist staff; a gardener and a cook, to run these sessions. The Program works best when the two specialist areas – the kitchen and the garden – work in partnership with each other, so that these elements form a harmonious cycle.

There are two unique factors about the Kitchen Garden Program. The first is the intrinsic link between the garden, the kitchen and the table. The emphasis is on learning about food and about eating it. No part of the Program can exist without the other. The second is the project is embedded in the curriculum. It is a compulsory part of the school’s program for four years of a child’s life.

2 thoughts on “Stephanie Alexander talks food in schools

  1. When I went to primary and intermediate school we always had a kitchen garden and it was such a thrill to take the vegies home to Mum and Dad.
    Why did we ever give up on this?
    It is also good exercise.

  2. “how do schools pay for there kitchens?”, lol, but then again im not one to talk when it comes to the correct use of words.

    Kitchens and growing facilities are a great idea, and have much more potential to help children from lower income families than anything like WFF or other benifits, which after all should be the main point of benifits; to bridge short gaps between employment, to assist in labour flexibility and to ensure that children receive equality of opportunity reguardless of how useless their parents are :P

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