NZ Green Party
David Clendon – Green Candidate Number 10

Continuing our series of video snippets of high ranked Green candidates, here’s David Clendon. David is an Auckland business advisor and lecturer in resource management of Pakeha and Ngapuhi me Te Roroa descent. On local Auckland issues he says:

The Genesis proposal to put a power station at Kaukapakapa does not make environmental, economic or social sense. The Greens will mobilise with others in the local community to oppose this controversial project. We will also support keeping Whenuapai as a defence facility, not a commercial airport.

23 thoughts on “David Clendon – Green Candidate Number 10

  1. “David is an Auckland business advisor and lecturer in resource management of Pakeha and Ngapuhi me Te Roroa descent.”

    Ah! so he’s tangata whenua! Not Tangata tiriti. His right to live in Aotearoa doesn’t depend on honouring the treaty.

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  2. Well spoken…in that extended soundbite, on one issue.

    Wonder what sort of message he will take to the lifestyle-blockers of Hellensville (Key’s electorate)? The price of oil would surely resonate, and would get some votes if he could articulate a Green plan for that somewhat sparsely populated area i.e. talk about public transport ain’t going to work.

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  3. What is your problem JH?

    If you are born in a country, you “inherit” rights and responsibilities from previous generations. You may not like all of them, but the fact remains that if you are descended from people who signed the Treaty of Waitangi, you have to accept the responsibilites and obligations which came with signing the Treaty (whichever side your ancestors were on). On the other hand, if you are a more recent migrant, you accepted certain responsibilties and rights when you arrived, and your children will also “inherit” these.

    If you don’t like this, fight for the necessary political change, but in the mean time, you have to live with the hand history has dealt you with (and honestly, you can’t really believe you have received a bad deal by being born in New Zealand (if you were born here))?

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  4. jh – your comment is puzzling – don’t both sides of a treaty enjoy the benefits and responsibilities of that treaty? Aren’t we all bound to honour the treaty? It seems the honorable thing to do.

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  5. Do the greens have a location where a electricity generation station can be built?

    Auckland is about to order 35 electric trainsets and there is a need for extra capacity to meet future demand.

    What timeline would this station be built to and will it be quick enough to meet the electrification of the Auckland rail network?

    Will the new station get RMA approval and be built before the electrification is complete and the new trainsets have arrived?

    Or will the new railsets be pulled by diesel locomotives until such time Auckland electricity grid is capable of running these units, plus meet the extra consumption electric cars may drain from the system.?

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  6. Probably be worth finding out what projects are currently in the pipeline Gerrit…

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  7. “Or will the new railsets be pulled by diesel locomotives until such time Auckland electricity grid is capable of running these units, plus meet the extra consumption electric cars may drain from the system.?”

    Well Gerrit, let us not forget that the SX carriages were originally built by Comeng for Brisbane’s electrification proposal of the 1950s. Of course, they spent their lives being hauled by steam, diesel and electric locomotives of all sorts.

    Also, Gerrit, don’t forget the twelve electric locomotives as well – they will draw even more power than the units.

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  8. # greenfly Says:
    July 7th, 2008 at 2:17 pm

    jh – your comment is puzzling – don’t both sides of a treaty enjoy the benefits and responsibilities of that treaty? Aren’t we all bound to honour the treaty? It seems the honorable thing to do.
    …………………………..
    Easy peasy..?
    Green policy states that the indigenous language is the correct one (by the convention of international law).
    However lets not ignore the historical circumstances.
    A task given to an unwilling Hudson and missionaries at a time when there were 60 to 70000 Maori (according to Michael King(?)) and about 2000 Europeans. The treaty necessarily left the power of the chiefs intact and proffered a kind of governorship on behalf of the British (keep Europeans in order and keep other powers away). It had nothing to do with the modern state of NZ (ie it didn’t envision NZ as it is today). The treaty is so different from the status quo in that it can never be truly satisfied utill NZ is a collection of tribal cantons.
    So what do we do ? We go part way down the road until someone whose has a Maori cultural identity is satisfied….. towards some loose flapping line or constantly changing horizon?. The attraction for the left is their perception that they have diagnosed all societies issues and know the ideal state and like to see thing move, so it gives a good handle to crank. Recently an academic reported that interest in the treaty was at an “all time low”….. too bad.
    The Greens want to go way beyond what National and Labour have under the Waitangi Tribunal. The Greens support indigenous ownership (or equivalent) of Foreshore and Seabed. As seen on bumper sticker: “Foreshore and Seabed Maori Foreshore”.
    There are 4.1 million of us now all wanting to use the great outdoors etc.
    In summary I think Green policy is naive to mischievous (given that ….some people might welcome revolution).

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  9. I understand that the electric trains will draw 30MW at peak. This is equivalent to 3 months electricity demand growth in Auckland. And electric cars will mostly charge at night, when demands on the electricity network are low.

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  10. bettertransport,

    not sure what you are saying. Do we need, or not need more electric power generation?

    StephenR.

    Googled, but cant find any new electritricity generation capacity about to be added to meet Auckland requirements.

    Can someone can enlighten us?

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  11. Hmm.

    How does a power station qualify as meeting “Auckland requirements”?

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  12. Also, there’s this (was looking for ‘electricity projects pipeline’ in NZ):

    * Geothermal — Three more geothermal plants are being constructed now by Contact Energy, Mighty River Power and Top Energy, which is expected to add 125 mega watts of capacity in the next two years. Another two plants totalling 130 mega watts have been consented in the central North Island. Another project, Te Mihi, is currently seeking consent. And my understanding is that yet more proposals are being prepared. Geothermal energy is consistent and reliable and not weather dependent, so it has a great potential as a stable baseload source. Contact Energy, Mighty River Power and other companies are actively developing the resource.
    * Wind — Two wind projects, in Manawatu and Wellington, are now under construction and are expected to deliver 188 mega watts. A further five wind farms collectively totalling 312 mega watts have been consented. To give you an idea of the interest in wind, applications for resource consent have been lodged for nine more projects totalling another 1700 mega watts. Yet more projects are in the pipeline.
    * Hydro — With respect to hydro, resource consents have been lodged for five South Island hydro projects that would deliver collectively up to 415 mega watts of capacity.

    http://www.beehive.govt.nz/speech/carbon+neutral+electricity+2025

    Not sure what Parker means by “resource consents have been lodged for five South Island hydro projects”. Applications? Consent has been given??? Also seems kinda keen to speed these projects up.

    9MW of electricity from co-generation plants in Taranaki too. (whoop)

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  13. Trustpower’s Wairua Valley mini project Aqua is being fought strenuously by local land owners who resent a private company being given the right under the Public Works Act to comulsorily take their land.

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  14. Well samiuela most white NZ’rs are not descended from people who signed the treaty of Waitangi unless you are telling me that I am descended from the crown i’m confused. So according to your logic i don’t have to honnor the treaty at all.

    Also please note the NZ government doesn’t have to honnor the treaty either. There is no legal requirement for the treaty to be honnored by any New Zealanders and no judge or court would ever rule to honor it. The Treaty was never ratified by either the english parliment or the nz parliment, so it isn’t even a treaty its just a piece of paper.

    How can something pass into law without the assent of the people via parliment and the assent of the crown via the governor general is beyond me, could you please explain otherwise Sam??

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  15. crest energy in northland, is wanting to do tidal energy,

    will put up info for northland and north island wind sights.

    also tidal possibilities in wellington.

    iwi, communities and funders need to work together and agree on possible and then new electricty sites and generation,

    and also energy conservation is needed.

    fuck genesis energy and meridian!!!

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  16. krest energy in hellensville is applying to make a tidal power station:

    far better than genesis energys fossil foolery.

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  17. northland has some wind potential, along with wellington, and wellington also has tidal potential – and so does the cook straight.

    we need a new zealand energy website – that is made for the public and very up to date.

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  18. I will add that it should be said that cook strait has RIDICULOUSLY MASSIVE tidal potential.

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  19. “I understand that the electric trains will draw 30MW at peak. This is equivalent to 3 months electricity demand growth in Auckland. And electric cars will mostly charge at night, when demands on the electricity network are low.”

    Hang on a second, does the 30MW include electric locomotives. Bear in mind that an electric locomotive draws more power than an electric multiple unit. Also, I seem to recall that was the demand growth in Auckland for one year, not three months.

    Either way, it is time to see the march of the pylons through the Waikato.

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  20. Turnip28,

    If you fully read my post, you would have seen that I said more recent migrants accept the rights and obligations of the country they migrate to, and so do their descendents. For example, I currently live in Australia, and have to abide by that countries laws, whether I like them or not. Similarly my children also have to abide by Australia’s laws. So, my logic does not imply more recent (post 1840) migrants to New Zealand don’t have to honour the Treaty.

    Before arguing about the legality of the Treaty, it is worth acknowledging that whatever the legal rights and wrongs of a situation are, the reality is that might is right. This is how New Zealand was really colonised by the British (although it took them quite a long time (and a few military defeats) to establish control over the whole of the country).

    However, if we are to look at the legality of the British colonisation of New Zealand, one might find that it is in the British (and more recent migrants) interests to honour the Treaty. Otherwise, there might well be a much stronger argument that British colonisation of New Zealand was illegal (not that that matters when you have more guns).

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  21. Sam you are now confusing Legality with Morality, The british colonisation of New Zealand was legal as their were no laws to break.

    In 1840 there was no international law so the british could legally annex New Zealand with force. Was this a moral thing to do, well no it wasn’t. One of the main reasons for rushing the signing of the treaty was that they were worried that the New Zealand company was going to annex NZ and they were trying to protect Maori rights.

    So when we talk about honouring the treaty we are doing this from a moral point of view not a legal point of view, their is a difference. This also allows us to honour the treaty to a point and no more. We are also not legally bound to honour the treaty.

    One thing that seems to have happened in NZ in the past 20 years is people seem to have all become focused on this idea of the legallity of the treaty which is absurd.

    The tribunal exists to right the moral wrongs of the past and nothing more.

    Just look at the seabed issue the government was legally allowed to block Maori access to the seabed since the Maori were arguing and using the treaty as a basis of argument when the treaty is not a legal document.
    If the treaty was a legal document then Maori would be able to argue in the high court of new zealand for just about everything they want and they should win too since the Treaty is pretty clear about granting those things.

    Note if us greens would like to push our Maori agenda we should first get ratification of the treaty which would require a referendum with a simple question like Is the Treaty of Waitangi a legally binding document?

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